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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1924"

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Faculty 



T. H. Garkett Principal 

Miss A. Dorothy Hains Latin 

IMiss Ada G. Woods ....English 

Miss AxNiE M. Page French 

Miss Jfi.ia A. Flisch Histor// 

Miss Gurtrude J. Comey English 

Miss Louise Parks English 

Miss Willamette Green Mathematics 

Mrs. Margaret C. Hurst History 

Miss Furlow Hollingsworth Commercial Subjects 

Miss Marcia A. Clark ..Domestic Arts 

Miss Lois Eve Science 

]\Lss Helkx Frank Eiiglish 

Miss Mildred Abernathy Latin 

]\Lss Katherine M. Comfort Applied Art 

ALss Leonora Ivey Physical Training 

]\Lss liOuisE Chiles English 

Miss Ama Lee Null Spanish 

Miss Eleanor Boatw right History 

Miss Edwixe W. Odom Science 

JMiKS Nancy E. Haddock Domestic Science 

Miss Ann Braddy Mathematics 

]\Lss IVLarion Hamilton History 

Miss Helen Anderson French 

RLss Gen A Callaway Mathematics 

]\Lss Edith Nachman Commercial Geography 

Miss Lois Hunt Mathematics 

Miss Margaret C. Kinnear English 

Miss Eliza heth Hughes Science 

Miss Juliet Obermiller Mathematics 

Miss Helene Norwood Science 

Mrs. W. C. Lyeth.. Mathematics and Geography 

]\Lss Helene Schilling Commercial Subjects 

Miss Dorothy Halbert Vocal Music 

Miss Emma Plunkett Physical Training 

]\Lis. Stannard Owens Librarian 

Miss Annie G. Smith Assistant Domestic Science 

Miss Louise Wilson Secretary 



The Faculty 

(Apologies to Jane Taylor) 

Wlio met us one September day 
And ended all our summer play 
By starting work without delay? 
The Faculty. 

Who's said to have a massive brain? 
('Tis something that we can't explain 
Because thev seldom make things plain). 
The Faculty. 

Who makes us sit up night and day, 
And study till our hair turns gray, 
And gives us not a cent of pav? 
The Faculty. 

If tlie people on the street, 
Chance bobbed hair or Fords to meet. 
Tell me, who is it they greet? 
The Faculty. 

Who gives demerits as we pass, 
Thru the halls, from class to class, 
Although they are talking "en masse?" 
The Faculty. 

But when at last next June is here 
And our Commencement's drawing near 
Who then will seem to us most dear? 
Tlie Faculty. 



-Lucy Goodeich Henry, '25. 



Class Poem 

+ + 

( With Apologies to Edgar Allan Guest) 

Along tlie paths of lifu, there are faces new today ; 

There are youtlifi.I hearts and sturdy, whose feet are on tlie forward way. 

To tlie rugged roads of duty we have turned without a sigh, 

For with us, as with others, our high school days must die. 

And we're looking- back and remembering the friends we left behind, 
We're calling back our "farewells" and urging, "Never mind." 

"Oh. never mind, dear school of ours, that we come not again ; 
Never mind our years of toil, of sorrow, or of pain. 

For we've found tlie path, of life wiiere the flags of duty fly, 

And we know the lessons you've taught so well can never, never die. 

For never life can break us; oh, the years, they cannot fade 
The memory of your ])rinci])les ; the words 'Be not afraid.' " 

Along the paths of life, there are faces new today, 

And ambition's flags are flving as we march along our way; 

P'or our hearts have learned the lesson, give the world your very best 

By sacrifice and courage, and life will give you rest. 

And when we've claimed eternal splendor and found eternal youth. 

Thanks be to you, dear Tubman High, who taught "Eternal Truth." 

— Madaline Green, '24. 



Senior Class 



+ 4- 

Class Colors — Blue attd White Class Flower — Daisy 

Motto — "ITV xcUl find a xvay or make one.''* 

OFFICERS 

Dorothy Fund President 

Elizabeth Kreps Vice-President 

Marion Andrews. Secretary and Treasurer 



HARRIET ALEXANDER! 

Harriet did not join mir class until we were Juniors, 
but we consider her quite a valuable addition. Some 
think Harriet a quiet little thing, but would they if 
they were in chemistry with her? This Georgia peach 
never ivorries over spilt jnilk or that which is going to 
he spilt. We think her quite a gloom chaser. 



CKACE ANDERSON 

Grace believes in the old adage, "'Speech is silver, 
but silence is golden," and must be trying to make 
herself a millionaire, for very seldom is her voice 
heard in any of our arguTnents. However, if Grace's 
desk was vacant at classes we should surely miss 
her. 



MARION ANDREWSi 
Not only do toe prize Marion for her brilliant dis- 
play of knowledge, hut for her gentle and kindly 
manner. She has served her school mates in many 
prominent offices, even having the funds of the 
Senior Class entrusted to her keeping! What greater 
proof does one need of her dependability f It is she 
who has inspired the composition of the literary gems 
in this publication. In short, Marion has made Tub- 
man a better place by her presence. 





LOUISE BALK! 
Louise is the most dashing blonde in our class. 
She toill undertake to do anything, for she is quite 
fearless and never lacking in self-confidence, however 
the latter is not misplaced. When it comes to Latin, 
Louise has nev^er been known to fail, for when you 
see her knit her brow in great nnxietg as she bends 
over her Virgil, you may be certain that that froicn 
will soon tiirth into a triumphant smile as the diffi- 
cult lines are conquered — and Louise conquers other 
things besides Latin — but this is getting too personal. 

CATHERINE BELDING 
192lf, like all other classes, has those to whom she 
turns for dependability. Catherine is just such a 
one to whom we cati instrust the execution of a dif- 
ficult task. Especially does Miss Flisch think this 
because every time she forgets where she left off in 
giving the history reports, she always starts with 
Catherine. 



LOUISE BLITCHINGTON 

Senior "C"s doll baby. Louise's small statttre does 
not make her small in quality. Little things are 
always the sweetest, so it is in this case. Because of 
her many admirable qualities she has entwitied her- 
self around the heart of every Big Senior. 



ANNIE SUE BRAWNER 
We all knotv some girls ivhose good disposition and 
even temper are two of their strong characteristics. 
Annie, here, is just one of them. She never seems to 
get "peeved" except in the French Class, and I think 
that this is because she doesn't get the question or 
setjtence as perfectly as she might wish. 



LIXDSEY BUCKI 

The business woman. Lindsey tells us that she ex- 
pects to enter the busiiiess world. We trust that her 
future will be as bright as her past. Lindsey is a 
good girl that any class would be glad to own. 






ALICE CARSWELL 

Alice, the girl ivitfi so much to say that she says 
nothiii'j- Alice didn't come to Tubman until the rest 
of our class was well launched iu the Sophomore 
year. However, she immediately worked her way to 
the fop of the class and has been very successful iu 
remaining there. Luck to you, Alice; we hope you 
may remain on top iu everything through life. 



EUNICE CHAPMAN 

When we first knew Eunice she loas quiet and shy, 
hut lately, through her contact with so rnantj girls, 
she is becoming one of our most eloquent talkers and 
has been known to talk for three hours, in type- 
writing, without a rest of more than fifteen mimites. 
But friendliness is next to goodliness, and so Eunice 
proves an agreeable companion anytime, anywhere. 



KATHERINE CRAWFORD 

Kate has been with ?/s ever since tve were wee lit- 
tle Subs, and has worked side by side with most of 
us in our struggle for a dip. She is another one who 
doesn't say much, but .since, "He that keepeth /(fs- 
mouth keepeth his life" ;/'f feel that some thiu shr 
will he richly rewarded. 



EDNA DAVIS 

Although Edna has been with us only during our 
Senior year we have found that we have missed. 
much by not having her friendship in the lower 
classes. Edna is a studious girl, and in book-keeping 
she is especially studioifs, for who is it that has seen 
a cash book that she could not balance? It is her 
willingness to help her class and many other quali- 
ties that make her so dear to us. 



ELIZABETH DOWLINCI 
Dida, with her dignified air of knowledge. fUda ;n 
really a .*imart girl, but that isn't saying so much for 
her, for she is one of that ki»d of girls icho do every- 
thing their very t>e.*it, whether it he studying, play- 
ing basket f}all, cleaning up her room, or concentrat- 
ing on a romantic movie. Dida says that because 
of her precise habits she is destined to go through 
life alone, but who can believe that when looking 
into her ttig, starry egesf 





SAKAH DOWLINGI 

Sartifi, ifitfi Eliznheth, fortus the pair of "Double 
D's." Snrnh may he serious looking, but it in doubt- 
ful if she is ever given to serious thoughts; however, 
she is cotiscietitious euough, a girl of her word, and 
a good sport. Much wore could be said in her praise, 
but as one of her attributes is her modestf/, I do not 
want to make her blush. 



GEORGIA DURDEN 

Georgia is considered one of the hardest working 
girls in the Senior Class. There are many u^ho gain 
knowledge by very easy methods, but if is not so 
with Georgia. She is striving from early morn to 
late at night to gather the bits of knowledge which 
will at last be rewarded with a "'dip." When Geor- 
gia leaves Tubman it can be said that a true and 
faithful student has left. 



ANNIE ELLIOTT 

Annie is a quiet girl, very lady-like in her man- 
ners; ive have never seen Annie angry or excited. 
On Monday when everybody is upset, she comes in 
as soft and gentle as a May morning. Her gentle 
ways and charming manners have endeared her to 
the hearts of every jnember of the class of '^/*. 



DOUOTHV EVANS 
Dorothy is the proud owner of an unusual record. 
She can boast of having never cut a single class or 
even '"gym." This is something to be proud of, and 
Dorothy ^rouldn't give this record for any A — in 
trigonometry tff?f She is good uihen it comes to 
"Miss Flisch's Complimentary Thought Questions." 
Never would Dorothy be sent to study hall for read- 
ing a letter in class. 



KOSA FRASER\ 
We ue.rt iulrodurc our noted class-mate, Rosa 
Fraser. Hosii is quite a marvel on the piano, and 
we expect some day to see her name written as the 
greatest among musicians. Hosa never speaks unless 
spoken to so that although we probably ivouldn't lis- 
ten if she did speak (being busy with the same occu- 
pation) we know lit fir about her. 



ROSE FINKELSTEIN 
From '%vay over in Poland came Rose. She hasn't 
been irith ns so iiery long, but tee all feel as fhoiir/h 
wt' couldn't do without her now. You ju.<it can't 
imagine how smart she is. Just think of making us 
in the history examination! All of us are devoted 
to her and just envy her her ftniile. 



MADALINE GREENi 

We have with us here the famous ^ioetess, Madn- 
line. She hasn't decided whether to continue com- 
posing verse or to teach history as substitute for 
Miss Flisch. Madoline has as many good points as a 
paper of pins, and we may he .<tvre that whatever 
she undertakes she will do well. 



SARAH GREEN 
Sarah Green is not very fat or lean. She is not 
very good or mean, and this is all I know of Sarah 
Green. Everything is "well" with Sarah when she 
.<ttorts to recite. We know that from Sarah's favorite 
expression, "well," "er." when asked it ifiiestimi In 
chiss. 



ELLA MAE GUNTER 

Ella Mae has brightened up our oral compositio)i 
days by giving her "noteless talks." Never was Elln 
Mae known to vse her notes when giving a talk. We 
not only enjoy being in Ella Mae's presence on this 
particular day. hut on all days, because we have 
found her friendship very enjoyable. 



MARIE GUV 

Marie Guy is the quietest and most dignified ntem- 
ber of the class of 'iU. During our four years' 
friendship with her, ive have never seen her angry or 
ruffled in the least; and ivhUe Marie is tait the one 
to attract attention in any kind of display, never- 
theless she has won our whole hearted atimiration. 





RUTH HARDIN 

We can never remember when Ruth didn't tjet A'a 
or A-\-'s on her report. She has been with us for 
these five long years and we hope that she will 
alfvaifs be as nnselfish and attractive as she has 
proven herself to be. She will alwai/s be remem- 
hererl as one of 'Sli's most poptilar f/irls. 



FRANCES HARLEY 

f^roiices is quiet and serene; nothing seems to 
worry her. and she has a sense of humor. Rather a 
pleasing combination, isn't it? Moreover, she is a 
very graceful rope-walker as all can testify who saw 
her when she impersonated Miss Boatwright in the 
Senior Play. 



RUTH HINTON 

This is the girl with the pleasant smile who craves 
study. She is one among the few who has really 
put on a serious look and a dignified expression 
since she reached the stage of Seniority. She will 
make a success, we know. 



IVV HIXSONr 

"Ask Ivy. she knows," the oft-repeated saying of 
Senior B, for Ivy is the "child prodigy" of the class 
of '2lt. Besides she is versatile, too, for she is ac- 
complished in the arts of cooking, seiving, 7nusic, 
hiking, swimming, and is an all-round good sport. 
She has never been known to lose her temper, and 
her patience is inexhaustible. 



ONIE HIXSON/ 
A'o one would expect that little cherubic Onie, one 
of the followers from the Sub-Freshman year, would 
have become one of our dignified Seniors, but such 
she is. She always knew her trigonometry and 
French tratislattons. She can't sympathize with some 
of us, because she has never had to go to ifummer 
school. 



LILLIAN HOOAX 

Miss Flisch could iiever proceed iu histonj class if 
she called on Lillian Hogan and did not receive her 
nsnnl "Don' cha knowf" — but notwithstandinfj Lil- 
lian's repeated utterance hi histnri/, ice have found 
her a vert/ valuable friend, and one whom we arc 
prifud tit call our class mate. 



CAROLYN HOWELL | 
Carolyn, with Harriet, makes us the duet of "Lotus 
Eaters." Having once learned that it does not pap 
to worry, she has given herself up to the pleasures of 
this life. Her pleasing and beaming physiognomy is 
sure to carry joy wherever she chances to go. 
French is her hobby in school, but outside of school 
it is Fords and somebody (quite partirnlar about 
those Somebodies) to drive them. 



MARY MEKCER JACKSON \ 
Mary M. is the champion giggler of our class; her 
charming giggle, however, does not imply an empty 
head, for that is a talent which those who are too 
ivise or too foolish cannot p^issess. Giggling, how- 
ever, is not her only accomplishment — far from it; 
she can play basket ball along with the best of them, 
find if you want to know any more of her good 
points just go to Miss FUsrh. 

BLANCHE JONES 
Blanche is the skinny iconder of our class. We 
wonder if even her shadotv will remain by the time 
.s/ie gets her "honorable discharge" from Tuttman. 
She has been with us all along, ei^en at summer 
school, last summer — not because she flunked, boiv- 
e ver — oh , no! Sh e wo uld never com m it tha f sin . 
She is too studious for that. Does wet weather 
dampen her aiiiiahlr lcm}){'r<tmriit f Indeed, no — 
only her hair. 



MARY B. JONES 
Mary is rather like an umbrella — not i)i looks, but 
in usefulness, }Vhen you are happy and gay, Mary 
is that way. too, and }rhen you are "down in the 
dumps" Mary ca)i sympathize to perfection. Al- 
though she is not an athlete and is not one of this 
"never miss a question" kind, she is an all aroimd 
girl and every one likes her. 








ELIZABETH KREPSl 

Here, t/oii hthuld the striking coiniiename of one 
(if the most gifted members of ovr class. Besides 
beivg a good student, and unsurpassed entertainer, 
s/te can sing, play, make speeches — in fact, she can 
do anijthing she is called upon to do. Whenever you 
see a plait of hair banning down somebody's back, 
you may he sure it is Elizabeth's. That in one of 
the many reasons we like her so, she is made on an 
entirely new plan. 



ANNIE LEE LANGSTON 

To be jovial and carefree is characteristic of Annie 
L ee . hut sh e h as th e added q uality of becom in g 
si'ritjns at u-ill. Annie Lee is one of the most lovable 
girls in our cla.ts. Her sunny dispositio)! and bright 
smile have won the hearts of all her class mates. 
Not only are these things to her credit, bvt she sings 
beautifully ; indeed, the entire school is proud to 
boast of such a member. 



DOROTHY LEVY 

D-O-T — Dot, one of the "Heavenly Twins," is one 
of the few people who have both good looks and 
brains besides a true blue character. Dorothy's won- 
derful black curly hair has catised many a girl to 
loose sleep trying t<i vnrl her straight bob with 
curlers. And as for having brains — well all we can 
adequately say is that she is a shining star. Bvt 
best of all is Dorothy's friendship which when once 
given stands all fe.<fts. 



MARGARET LOCKHART/ 

Margaret is one of the wonders of onr class and is 
especiallif prominent in our trig, class, where she 
and Miss Green talk the language of trigonometry, 
the said talk, as a rule, sailing high above our hum- 
hie heads. In spite of this and other similar in- 
stances, hoivever, Margaret has won the friendship 
a}id iidniiration of the irh<ile nf the class of ':i!t. 



DOROTHY I.OMHARD I 

// you ever look for Dorothy at school you only 
have to go up to the art room, where you ivill find 
her pouring over a batik design. Out of school she 
may be found speeding around somewhere in her 
Ftird canpe. Xot the least of her worries is Mr. J. 
CtHsar, but he will not cause her any .sorrow when 
June Ihi' lu-ilfih rolls around. 



NATALIE MERRV | 

Natalie came to Tubman along with the rest of our 
class and distitigitisfted herself by not being /n.sf in 
the halls of our spacious and elegant building. She 
is "trcs petite," ivhich, however, does not mean quiet, 
for wherever Natalie is, there some }ioise is also. 
(Natalie does her bit toward keeping our tt-arhers 
bus//). 



LUCILE MEYER \ 

Most of us have to console ourselves aliouf irhai's 
on the outside of our heads by what's on the inside. 
But Lucile, lucky girl, needs no consolation and, 
moreover, her beauty is not jnst skin deep. She has 
won friends and admirers by the score, by her sweet 
disposition, her charming smile and hei- graceful 
dancing. But are her admirers just friends, and 
her friends just admirers? Well there are some cer- 
tain people who ivould flatly deny that. 

MAXIXE MILLER 

Maxine — our treasure. To put one adjective be- 
fore Maxine's name would be ridiculous for the sim- 
ple reason that it would not be sufficient. Maxine is 
smart, witty, full of pep, and is usually spoken of as 
"the best typist at Tubman.'' She also makes a won- 
derful friend, and she'll stick f)y you through thick 
aud thin. Shi' is truly a fri'asurr that aim clttss 
wuiihl hi- proud ti, o,r,i. 

ELEANOR MOKKISi 
Eleaitor has tteen one of our fellow sufferers for 
the last five years and during her heroic fight for a 
dip she has done wonders iu spreading sunshine in 
the dark corners at Tubman. Besides this, Eleanor 
has kept more than one poor girl from being compli- 
menfed by one of Miss FUsch's famous thought ques- 
tions by keeping the said teacher busy answering her 
numerous inquiries. However, Eleanor is a nni- 
versal favorite with teacheis and pupils alike 

MATTIE MAE MORRIS 

Mnttie Mae believes that "children should be seen 
and not heard," and acts accordingly. Don't get the 
impression that Mattie Mae is timid or bashful, 
though, because she can make an oral composition 
for Miss Woods and not be in the least flustrated 
like the rest of us. She has, however, progressed. 
farther than most of our class for she associates ivith 
college students, the college being situated near the 
University Hospital. Aside from this, Mattie Mae 
has one of the best dispositions in our class and is an 
altogether popular girl. 





LILLIAN MORGAN'/ 

lUiiUy she is very good Utokintj : not only does 
Scuior C. agree to this but also J. Geo, Mc. — well, I 
had better not go into details. Lillian is a very 
Hiarvfloiis girl, for besides having good looks she is a 
imnderful dressmaker, and it is because of this fact 
that she always dresses in the latest fashitms. Out- 
sUinding all other qualities there is her grand dispo- 
sition. We trust that Lillian loill make a successful 
business womai}. but according to her choice of mat- 
ter in dictation for shorthand, we think that she is 
cftnsideriug a ta ft her career thatt that of a business 
woman. 

KATHERINE MOORE I 
Katherine is one of the hardest icorkers in our 
class, being the only girl in it to have made the five 
years in four, and we expect her to accomplish still 
greater things. She is a girl that aspires high and 
"fair" for Vassar is her goal. Katherine it'orks 
unusiially hard when it comes to debating, or better, 
informal arguing. 



ADDIE MLNDAVi 
Addie is the latest addition to our famous Senior 
Class of 'iU. However, Addie has been a Sub, etc., 
along with the rest of us, only her debut into the 
Senior Class was delayed because of the latent ap- 
preciativeness of her teachers. Addie has, of course, 
won all of our hearts and we sincerely ivish her suc- 
cess in her struggle for a dip. 



hVCl.\ XOKRIS \ 
Lucia entered Tubman five gears ago and. like 
her class mates, she was very meek the first year. 
She recovered her equanimity in all classes, hoivever, 
the second year, that is, until she becatne a dignified 
Senior and secured Miss FUsch for a teacher, when 
she lost all of her deep rooted serenity. Lucia is 
making a great struggle and we hope that she will 
lie as successful in ttbtnining her dip as she has been 
in the past in athletics, for Lucia is one of our star 
h'. H. plftyers. 



ELIZABETH OLIVER ' 

Xej-t in line comes "Liz," the Athletic girl. Eliza- 
Iteth and Eunice form the Varsity clique, the main 
object of which is to usurp the position of fonrard 
regardless of all other ct)ntestants. In our class are 
sharks and d}nnbbells, but Elizabeth is neither-one; 
u-e think her an all-round good sport. 



ALICE PEEBLES I 

When one actvaUy penetrates the screen of Alice's 
timiditi/, she finds a love of sports and fun that is 
rare. Alice is a sweet, lovable girl, and although 
she says little, thinks a great deal, and when she 
calls herself your friend, she is oue i)i the full sense 
of the word. 



MARY PLUMB I 

We never knew before what an orator we had in 
our midst until Mary revealed her beautiful poise, 
self-control and "Wait, I forgot," as she does in 
chapel. Really, she would make poor Ben Franklin 
and Pat Henry feel unimportant if they were here. 
Mary's attractiveness 7nakes us all love her. 



DOROTHY PUND » 

We now have the unprecedented honor of present- 
ing our most distinguished and celebrated class pres- 
ident. Can a prophet have honor in her own coun- 
tryt We count Dorothy as a priceless treasure of 
this class of natural phenomena, with her executive 
ability, her ynusical genius and her winning person- 
ality. But, alas, we fear that we can but inade- 
quately appreciate her supernatural powers, for the 
world of fame must soon claim its own. 



LAURA QUINN \ 
The Senior Class is proud of Laura Quinn, the 
shorthand ge^iius, who has one of the sweetest per- 
sonalities in Tubman. Laura is such an expert in 
her stenographic work that she has already taken a. 
Civil Service examination and is contemplating tak- 
ing Miss Hollingsworth's position. Laura has been 
a great help to the teachers by her willingness to 
do work for them and we do not knoiv ichat Miss 
Ivey would have done without her aid. 



JULL\ RHENEYi 

Julitr is one girl m many who never shit'ks her 
duties and can always be depended upon to do 
what she promises. With her lustrous hair and 
bright smile, she is a fascinating combination. 





SARAH RIDLEHOOVER i 
"Major Hoople," the eighth ivonder of the world. 
Sfirah's hobby is big words. We honestly heliei^e that 
she sleeps on the dictionary since that is the only 
plausible tvay for her to absorb the words that she 
uses, but since we don't know what half of them 
mean, we can only sit back and grin. Nevertheless, 
Sarah is a jolly girl in spite of her big W07-ds and is 
l/ie source of much of the fun in our sometimes 
itiouofonons days. 



ROSELLE ROSENTHAL 

Roselle is the champion bluffer of our class. We 
often wonder what ivould happen if she were to hand 
a paper in on time. This silvery-tongued girl has 
sauntered her ivay through Tubman with many 
friends and few enemies. Although she is **La 
Petite Chose," she is adequately fitted to make her- 
self heard. We do not know what Roselle is going to 
he ni the future, but she surely has the making of a 
movie star. 

EUNICE SAWILOWSKY i 

Three cheers for "Sally Wosky," the basketball 
captain and all-round athletic star of Tnbmanl 
What would our class or school have done without 
Eunice to throw goals in the peppy basketball games? 
.And what tronld the little Subs have done for a be- 
Inved "crush," for you know Eunice's recesses are 
all taken up in talking to her smalt admirers. Not 
nn/y do ive admire Eunice for her sportsmanship but 
for her frank and ran/lid disposition. 

KATHARVN SCHUMACHER I 
"Trinrulo" hails from Illinois. Katharyn is one of 
those girls that everybody likes in spite of o sar- 
castic nature. But the truth has no sting if it is 
tnid u'Uli the wittiness and goodwill with which 
Kal/iargn tells it. Katharyn is very good in lessons 
and takes particular jog in playing with the animals 
in the biology "lab," hut. all told, she thinks there is 
always time to giggle. 



JENNY CLAIRE STEED 
Everybody likes Jenny Claire^superlative praise! 
She has a perpetual supply of good sense, good 
humor and .strength of character. Smart! She can 
talk in Spanish, think in French, and write in Eng- 
lish. Do not be so quiet, Jenny Claire, we all like to 
know .smart people when we see them. 



SARAH TANENBAUM 
Sorafi belongs to the all-round type. She is a per- 
fect shark in any aquarium of math., history, 
French, Spanish, or English. Some people say '^Silence 
is golden;" when Sarah does talk her words are 
platinum. 



ADELAIDE THOMPSON 

We have become so attached to Adelaide that we 
would feel no longer a class without her. "Dell" 
has helped to brighten many dark moments, for 
some of us — mo7ne7its that would have had quite a 
different ending had it not been for her. She smiles, 
says a word or two, and the storm passes on. "Dell" 
is clever and popular, too; she has been and still is 
an all around good sport. 



LUCILE WHITLOCK 

Altho good-natured Lucile has her own opinions 
and is not afraid to stand by them, she is a friend 
to every one and if you will but let her talk to you, 
uninterrupted, for half an hour you will be installed- 
in her good graces for life. 



LOUISE WREN 
Louise is widely known for her sweet disposition, 

her willingness to help others and her contagious 
laugh, fin- when Louise's merriment breaks bounds 
everybody else follows suit. She is very quiet in 
classes, hoivever, and when next June cornes she will 
surely get her "dip." 




The Junior Class of T. H. S. 

I would not be a little "Sub" 

To meet' with many a jeer and snub; 
Nor yet a Freslnnan would I be. 

Whose greenness e\eryone can see; 
Nor of those "Sophs" who, in their eyes, 

Are great and grand and fine and wise ; 
Nor even of the Senior class, 

Tlicir day is over ; they must pass. 
Then what girls have ambition, hope. 

Of almost endless range and scope? 
What girls are square in all they do, 

The finest classmates, all true blue? 
The answer's this — no more, no less. 

The Junior class of T. H. S. 

— Velma Bell, '26. 




*-, 









Junior Class 



+ * 



Class Colors — Purple and Gold 



Class Flower — Pansy 



Motto — "Through the dust to the stars." 



OFFICERS 

Katherine Wiggins President 

Edna Reynolds ..Vice-President 

IsABELLE North .-_ .Secretary and Treasurer 

-h * 

Adams, Inez Hersey, Mary Reab, Laura 

Adams, Kate Hill, Caroline Redding. Helen 

Andrews. Rebecca Hill, Elizabeth Reese, Louise 

Arnold, Emma Hilton, Myra Reynolds, Edna 

Baxley, Mary Lou Hitt. Alma Roseman, Yetta 

Beale, Gertrude .Holmes, Louise..*^ Rosier. Nellie 

Bell, Dorothy \^ JoTinsbn." Margaret, • Sacre, Minnie 

Bell, Velma *'J&fdari, XaflieTine' Sammons, Lucia 

Bothwell. Ida King. Margie Sawilowsky. Belle 

Branch. Catherine Lamar, Mary Scarborough. Maydelle 

Brooks, Emily Lawrence, Ruby Schwitzerlet. Louise 

Brown. Eleanor Lass. Annie Laurie Shelfer. Zella 

Brown. Mary Leary, Marie Sikes, Mary 

Bnrch. Evelyn Lee. Sarah Sims. Marie 

Bush, Margaret Lester. Martha Simowitz. Louise 

Cain. Orrie Martin. Annie Mae Simpson. Delia 

Cannon. Myrtis McDaniel, Andrina Sizemore. Arvonia 

Cartledge. Alice McElmurray. Bettie Smith. Dorothy 

Chancey. Bessie McElmurray. Mildred Smith. Quilla 

Cook. Dorothy McElmurray, Dorotliy Spann, Alice 

Copeland, Ina Sue McLendon, Ehzabeth Skinner. Bessie 

Corley. Vaughn Miller, Eulalia Spaulding, Rose 

Crenshaw, Enunie Miller, Gladys Spires. Nina 

Criswell. Martha Mills. Willie Mae Steed. Lois 

Culpepper, Margaret Mol^Iey, Virginia Story, Elizabetli 

Culpepper, Meryl Morgan, Mary Summers, Alice 

Danfoth, Alice Morris, Mary Sylvester, Doroselle 

Downing, Mabla Moye. Catherine Tabb. Dorothy 

Edwards. Gladys Murpliy. Virginia Tunkle. Sadie 

Edwards. Mary Norrell, Frances Vaughn, Minnie 

Evans, Helen Norris, Sarah ' Wall, Ida 

Fell, Nellie North, Isabelle Wells, Grayson 

Franklin, Sarah O'Neal, Bernice Weltch. Addle Sue 

Friedman. Molhe Otis. Elizabeth Wescoat, Marguerite 

Fuller, Frances Owens, Claudine Whaley. Ruby 

Fldler, I'hilomena Owens, Mildred MHiite, I.illey 

Green. Cliristine I'ankin. Elizabeth White, May 

Greene. Ruth Parks. Lucile Whitlock. Eunice 

Cirossnmn. Ida Pearl. Rosina Wiggins. Katherine 

Hall. Lillie Mae Perkins. Alice Wilhelm. Inez 

Hawkins. Ethel Peterson, Louise Winter, Virginia 

Heath, Violet Phillips, Emma Woodall, Mary 

Helm. Irma Ponds. Dorothy Wright. Margaret 

Henry. Lucy Goodrich Ponds, Lauree Zealy, Mary 

Printup, Ruby 

Quinn, Susie 



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Sophomore Class 



Class Colors^Pi«A- (ind White Class Flower — Pink Rose Bud 

Motto — ^'One for alU (ind (dl for one.'^ 



OFFICERS 

Ola Hutchesox President 

Sara Sheppard Vice-President 

Blanche Powell Secret or ij and Treasurer 

+ ^ 

Andrews. Lucy Hardman. Catlierine Power, May Belle 

Armstrong, Mary Harvin. Mary Will Raburn. Julia 

Bannester. Ruby Hattaway. Leonora Randall, Inez 

Bell, Sarah Helmly, Louise Rhodes, Sunie 

Bishop, Vivian Holden, Lydia Rogers. Voncile 

Bland. Frances Holley, Arvis Rowland. Wiimina 

Bolin, Erma Howard, Langhorne Satcher, Einmalyne 

Bolin. Mary Hughes. Emma Sawilowsky, Estelle 

Brawner. Georgia Hughes, Eulawene Schaufele, lona 

Brooks, Mary Ellen Hutcheson. Ola Schneider. Heline 

Brown. Agnes James, Meryl Scott, Bessie 

Butler. Louise Jester. Lila Scruggs, Louise 

Burnette. Ruth Johnson, Floride Selden, Eugenia 

Carswell. Vera Jones. Clemmie Sellears. Eula 

Clark, Frances Jones. Elizabeth Senn. Ressie 

Chew. Mary Joplin, Katherine Shellhouse. Lucile 

Corhitt, Melvice Kelly. Lillian Sheppard, Sara 

Currie, Margaret Kelly, Lois Shivers, Asenath 

Curry. Kathryn Kuhlke. Blanche Shimotf, Pearl 

Davis. Lucile Lombard, Ruby Simons. Hazel 

Davidson, Jean Luckey, Jaunita Smith, Ellen 

D'Antignac, Martha Mayes. Myrtle Steed, Dene 

Dicks, Dorotliy Matheny, Gladys Steed, Helen 

Dicks, Helen McCormick. Elton Steinberg. Sarah 

Downing, Clemmie McElmurray, Margaret Steinberg, Theresa 

Dye, Ruth McElmurray, Mary Swain. Louise 

Dykes. Lollie Mae McEwen, Helen Tanenbaum. Minnie 

Ellison. Mary McLendon. Dorothy Tinley. Mary 

Fair, Laura Miller. Leone Tliompson. Alberta 

Fennell. Helen Morgan. Katie Tommins. Minnie 

Fennell, Maurice Morris. Virginia Trigg, Ellen Lyon 

Fiehis, Mary Moye. Louise Trowbridge, L>ucile 

Fike. Mary Belle Murrah. Martha Turner, Annabelle 

Fiske, Mary Neary, Mera ■ Turner, Margaret 

Fleming. Virginia Newton. Theo Vignati. Rosa 

Fletcher. Mary NorHs. Susie \Vallace. Betty 

Ford. Allie O'Conner. Lessie Ward. Rutli 

Fulcher, Eloise Oliver, Louise Warner, Elizabeth 

P'uller. Grace Owens, Jessie . Weathersbee, Iva 

Garrett. Mildred Parks. Margaret Weigle. Kate Louise 

Gilchrist, Eriine Perkins, Helen Wilensky. Jennie 

f>reen. Myrtle Phillips, Augusta Williams. Lillian 

Gunn. Margaret Phillips. Hilda Williams. Sarah 

Hagood. Ida May Plunkett. Sue Whitaker. Mildred 

Hair, Ruby Powell. Alice Winter, Caroline 

Hamilton, Elsie Powell, Blanche W^olfe. Frances 



Ul ■ 





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II 




•fU a^t Yei(scA«T.\ \aci\\\ ^a^\« ! 







FRESHMAN 



On'hoi^ I Kate to ^et ap in the Tno^t^in^ 
OK! KovO 13 We to lie in he^ ■, 
But trie liarclestblovO of all is to neatm motler 
call, 

70u^ott*>^oto 5c|ioo],iJou^otto goto 5c\eol,i/ou 
5ot todotoscliool tills momnb 



Freshman Class 



Class Colors — Red and White Class Flower — Nt^d Nose 

Motto — ''7V> be, not to seem; to do, not to drernn/^ 



OFFICERS 

Lois Van Pelt President 

Ethel Crooke ..,. Vice-President 

Sarah Whitney Secretary and Treasurer 

+ 4- 

AfJanis, Ruth Ellis. Marianne Moring:. Frankie 

Akerman, Elizaltetli Evans, Dellie Murphy, Mary 

Allen, Elsie Farris. Nettie Neibling:, Nancy 

Anderson. Annie Fender. Beulah O'Neal, Marguerite 

Anderson. Sara Ruth Ford. Catherine Owens, Alice 

Atkinson, Elizabeth Foster. Julia Owens, Mary 

Bailey, Ossie Fox. Josephine Paltrowitz, Annie 

Bailie. Marg;aret Gardner, Helen Patoli, Dorothy 

Bargeron. Edith Garner. Everlee Pate, Blondelle 

Barrett. Ann Garrett, Louise Pederson, Dorothy 

Barton. Ludie Gay. Annie Lou Peters. Mary 

Bassford. Lee Getzen, Frances Poole. Mary 

Berry, Lottie Lee Glisson. Estelle Pritchard, Mary Margaret 

Bell, Julia Goldstein, Rachael Reid, Carolyn 

Bennett, t.ucy Grablowsky. Miriam Redd, Lillian 

Benson. Mildred Grear, Evelyn Rodgers. Louise 

Berry. Lynelle Grnsin, Mollie Ruben. Rosa 

Bignon, Hilda Gunn, Kthel Schneider, Sophye Lee 

Blackstone. Inez Gunter, Pearl Seals. Grace 

Bothwell. Mary Haddlesay, Ruth Shealy, Eugenia 

Boxx, Evelyn Hair, Elma Speth. Dorotliy 

Brazelle. Mildred Hall. Dolores Spires. Elsie 

Brickie, Wvlena Hall. Evelyn Stewart, Virginia 

Britt. Ethei Hall. Uldine Stringer, Marguerite 

Britton, Margaret Hancock, Iris Stunnan. Elizabeth 

Broadwater, Katie Hancock. Nellie Tanenbaum, Minnie 

Broome. Verdine Hankinson. Stella Thomas. Mabel 

BjTd, Hattie Harley, Carolyn Thomas. Norma 

Cadle. Gennie Harper, Maiireiie Tliompson. Louise 

Capers, Clara Higgs, Odessa Trowbridge, Nell 

Capers. Ernestine Hiidebrandt, Marguerite Turner, Robbie 

Cates, Mabel Hill. Susie Van Pelt, Lois 

Cauthen, Louise Hixson, Vera Verdery, Catherine 

Ciiancy. Tlielma Horiie. Kiitli AVade, Louise 

Chandler, Elizabeth llunipbrev, Charlie Bell "Walker, Rubye 

Cohen. Dora Hurt. Maude M'alteis. Helen 

Cooke, Irene Hutto. Eugenia Walters, Louise 

Connor. Edith Inglett. Thelma Walton. Gnssie 

Copeland. Ellen Jordan. Ruth Waters. Bertha 

Copeland, Sara Kemiicott. Llewellvn Wel>b. Hattie 

Crawford, Lucile Knight. Ruth Wells, Marie 

Crooke. Ethel Langley. Doris WHialey, Lula 

Davidson, Lila Levy. S'etta Whitney, Sarah 

Davis. Bennola Littleton, Helen Wiggins, Ruby 

Deas, Dorothy Lynch. Ida WMlcox. Julia 

Dorn. Hazel Maddox. Thelma M'iliiams. Sudie Boyd 

Dunham. Elizabeth Matheny. Katherine Williamson, Lillian 

Dyches. Elinor . Markwalter. Floretta AVilliamson. Virginia 

Edwards. P'lorrie Maxwell. Jeanette Wood, Margaret 

Elliott. Irene McCarty, Leila Belle Yearty, Annie 

Elliott. Margaret McCormack, Dorothy Young, Thelma 

Mobley, Jean 

Moore, Ehzabeth 




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i 



Sub-Freshman Class 

Class Colors — Black and Gold Class Flower — Pansy 

Motto — "To the stars through bolts and bars." 

OFFICERS 

Nancy Clakk - — President 

Connor Cleckley Vice-President 

Maydelle Tunkle Secretary and Treasurer 

+ + 

Adams, Jaunita Goss. Mai'graret North, Wallace 

Allen, Matilda Griffin, Alice Oliver, Lottie 

Anderson. Ruby Gunn, Cecil Owens, Carolyn 

Andronosky, Ida Belle Hauler, Evelyn Owens, Margaret 

Anthony, Sara Hair, Agnes Teebles, Cary 

Armstrong, Jaunita Hardaway, Louise Printnp, Elizabeth 

Babbit, Mary Hardy, Beatrice Ramsey, Florence. 

Baird, Alene Harris, Mary Rennison, Alma 

Baird, Sarali Harmon, Kathleen Rennison, Nellie 

Barohan, Irene Harrison, Marian Rhodes, Anna Kate 

Beazley, Mary .Mice Henderson, Parmie Rheney, Louise 

Blanchard, ^iary Ennna Hoffman, Beatrice Rickerson, Katie 

Bothwell, Marguerite Bolton. Agnes Rickerson, Una 

Bo\\ers. Maiietta Hogan. Vivian Ridgely, Elizabeth 

Boyd. EUzabeth House, Norma Rivers, Elizabeth 

Brady, Lo\iise Hook, Lillian Robinson. Laura 

Brigliam, Mary Howard, Ruth Rock, Esther 

Brisendine, Elizabeth Hucliingson, Mary Rogers, Edna 

Bristow, .\nnie Mae Hulbert, Marie Rowe, Daisy 

Brown, Jaunita Inglett. Xoi-nia Rowe, Edna 

Busbia, Marian Jarrell, Gertrude Saunders, Eloise 

Byrd, Elizabeth James, Elnia Saunders, Elise 

Caldwell, Mary Jennings, Billie Sawilovvsky, Birdie 

Canada, Thelrna Johnston. Kathleen Scarboro, Elsie 

Cartledge, Mildred Jones, Ann Seago, Edna 

Casey, Muriel Jones, Catherine Sherlock, Sarah 

Chavous, Gladys Jones. Edna Shivers. Mary 

Chavous, ."Kudry Jones, Frances Skinner, Margaret 

Cliett, Jeanett Joplin, Mary Smith, Marallise 

Clark, Nancy Kelly, Mary Smith, Ellen 

Clarke, Mary Kent. Lillian Smith. Hazel 

Cleckley. Connor Kitchens. Elinor Steele, Ruby 

Cletnmons, Ruth Knight, Edna Spaulding. Mary 

Cooper, Gertrude Koss, Nellie Stanford, Roesel 

Cupelan. Evelyn Lamar. Cary Stockton. Merle 

Crcnsliaw. Lucile Laniback. Dolly Stoniker. Carrie 

Crickenberger. Corienne Lamkin. Nora Stoniker. Hattie 

Croiuer. Cleo Layton, Marian ' Story, Ruth 

Cully, Marion Levy. Rose Street. Ellen 

Daly. Rosa Lonergan. Ahna Sullivan, Katherine 

Danfortli. Thomasine Macrnurphv. .\dele Sumerau. .\lice 

Dansby, Marie Macky. Elizabeth Thomas. Myra 

Davitlson. .\lma Maddox, Gladys Tommins, Louise 

Decker, Dorothy Maddox, Mildred Toole, Grace 

Derrick, Harriet McCarthy. Louise Trader. Ruth 

Dickson. Frankie McClain, Lucile Tunkle, Maydelle 

Doolittle, Katie Mae McClain, I'hrontis VanPelt. Elizabeth 

Dorn, Martha McCollock, Evelyn \'aughn, Evelyn 

Dunn, Louise McCormack, Catherine Walker, Elizabeth 

Dnrden. Mary Willie McEwen. Cawthon Wall. Thelrna 

Edwards. Flossie McKenzie. Leona Walton. Dell 

Edwards, Julia McNutt. Helen Walton. Susan 

Edwards, Martha Miller, Martha Ward, .Annie Kate 

Edwards. Nettie Minnis. Margaret Watson, Fa>' 

Edwins, Myrtis Mobley, Elizabeth Watson, Lola Belle 

Fair, Catherine ' Mobley. Lydia Weathers, .\nnie Kate 

Flowers, Mary Montgomery. Daisy Willi.uus. Allene 

Foster. Helen Moore. Louise Williams. .\lma 

Ferguson. Elizabeth Morgan. Agnes Wilson. Margaret 

Gardiner. Mary C. Moring. Margaret Wilson. Maudie 

Gerald. Evelyn Morris. Adrienne Womack. Ruth 

Goldfarb. Margaret Mumford. Ruby Yates, Frieda 

Goodell, Mabel Neal, Georgia Young, Margaret 

Nixon, Catherine 



ORC 




INIZATIONS. 





Klnnlii'tli Kii'lJX Miihil Dnirniiiu Miiiciuiriti- Wesrorit 

Mnrniii Aiirlrrir.i Velmi, Hill 

Miiri/iinl l.nikhai-l ^nrii/i Uiillvhiinrer Isiiliille .\i}illi 

Louifiii Balk Sitsit' QuitiH 

Eliziihelli Oliver Eihiii Hi innihls 



Annual Staff 

+ + 

SENIOR EDITORS 

Sarah Ridlehoovek Editor-hi-Chicf 

Margaret Lockhart Business Manager 

Marion Andrews Libera rtj Editor 

Elizabeth Ki-.ei's Art Editor 

Louise Balk Picture Editor 

Elizabeth Oliver Athletic Editor 



JUNIOR ASSISTANT EDITORS 

Marguerite Wescoat Assistant Edit or-ni-Chief 

Isabelle North Assistant Business Manager 

Yelma Bell Assistant Literary Editor 

Mabel Downing Assistant A rt Editor 

Susie Quinn Assistant Picture Editor 

Edna Reynolds Assistant A ihhtic Editor 



Athletic Council 

Miss Ivey Physical Director 

Miss Pluxkett Assistant Physical Director 

Dorothy Fund President 

Dorothy Dicks - Secretary 

Alice Summers Treasurer 

Miss Flisch Faculty Representative 

Elizabeth Oliver Senior Representative 

Martha Lester ..Business Manager and Junior Representative 

Minnie Tommins... .Sophomore Representative 

Ruth Adams... Freshman Representative 

Nancy Clark Sub-Freshman Representative 

Mr. T. H. Garrett Principal Ex-ojficio Member 

LuciLE Meyer Hostess 

Eunice Sawilowsky. Captain Varsity Team 

Mary- Plumb Mary Edwards 

Cheer Leaders 



Tubman Glee Club 



+ ■}• 

OFFICERS 

Dorothy Pund P reside ni 

Mary Phtmu Viee-President 

LuciLE Meyer Secretary ^ 

Mary' Edwards Treasurer 



•i- + 



Andrews, Lucy 
Andrews, Marion 
Andrews, Keliecca 
Halk, Lonise 
Heil, Julia 
not li well, Ida 
Brickie, Wylena 
Brown, Mary 
Bush. Margaret 
Clark. Nancy 
Cooper, (lertrude 
Culpepper. Merjrl 
Dunham. Elizaheth 
Edwards. Mary 
Franklin, Sarah 
Fnlcher, FJoise 
(iarrett, Louise 
(larrett. Mildred 



MEMBERS 

Green. Myrtle 
Criffin, Alice 
HoUey, Arvis 
Hixson, Vera 
Johnson, Marjraret 
Kelly, Lois 
Kinff. Margie 
Kreps, Flizal)eth 
Langston, Annie Lee 
Lester. Martha 
Maxwell, Jeanette 
Meyer, Lucile 
Miller, Eulalia 
Miller, Gladys 
Mobley. Virginia 
Neary, Mera 
North, Lsabelle 
(His, Elizabeth 
Peterson. Louise 
riuinl). Mary 



I'hinkett, Sue 
Trintup. Knby 
rnnd, Dorothy 
Reynolds, Edna 
Rowland. Wihnitia 
Situs. Marie 
Spetli, Dor()tIiy 
Stanford. Roesel 
Steinberg. Sarah 
Wall. Ida 
Wallace. Betty 
Walters, Louise 
Weigle. Kate Louise 
White. Lilley 
Wiggins. Katherine 
Wilcox, Jidia 
Voung. Margaret 
Zealy. Mary 



The Honor League Council 

+ >}• 

Elizabeth Kreps -.. - President 

Katherine Wiggins -.- Secretary 

Ivy Hixson : Senior Representative 

Ida Wall Junior Representative 

Elizabeth \Vakxeii Sophomore Representative 

Bessie Scott Freshman Representative 

Li LA Davidson Suh-Freshman Representative 

Miss Annie M. Pac:e Mrs. M. Hurst 

FacuJt I) Representatives 



The Honor League 

+ + 

When we lay our books away 

On our graduation day, 
^VlR•Il we leave old Tubman's halls to do and dare, 

When we scatter far and wide, 

AVe will still be true and tried, 
i'or the "Honor League" has taught us to be sijuare. 

When we lay our books away 

On our graduation day, 
AVe will kee]) the standards high we learned in scliool. 
"Leagued in Honor" binds us fast, 

With high ideals that will last. 
Wv will make "Be Square" our motto and our rule. 

When we lay our books away 

On our graduation day. 
Tilings worth while we shall remember when we part. 

Ciiaracter cannot be bought. 

This is what our league has taught. 
Its idi'als we will cherish in our hearts. 

— Ei.i/.AiiKiii KuKi's, '24'. 



mm% 




Senior Class Day 



History of the Class of lUj^Jf 

■^^^-^HK CLASS of 1924 has had a liard road to travel and we might truly 
fl J he termed the "hard luck" Class of Tubman. Our work has been cease- 

^^^^r less and our tasks have been difficult, and many a time has our future 
looked gloomy and uncertain. Hut we struggled on with our renowned, un- 
quenchable zeal, and now, witli our goal in sight, we are able to h)ok back over 
our five years with pride in our achievements. 

In tiie fall of 1919, with one hundred and ten members, we entered Tubman, 
not as Freshmen but as the first Sub-Freshman Class. As we were the youngest 
class Tubman had ever had, we received more tlian our share of teasing and 
initiation. We held ourselves aloof from such as tliis and went our way calmly. 
However, our Sub-Freshman year was not witliout importance, for several 
memorable events occurred. Two organizations wliich have Ijeen greatly bene- 
ficial to Tubman, Tlie Honor League and the i\thletic Association, were first 
established with, no doubt, the help of our great influence. The Sub-Freshman 
Glee Club was also organized and presented the charming operetta, "The Wild 
Rose." In order to record the numerous sciiool activities tiie first edition of 
Tubman's annual, "Maids and a Man," was publisiied in 1920. Tluis we ])assed 
through the never-to-be-forgotten days of the ])erennial greenness of our Sub- 
Freshman year. 

The outstanding features of our Freshman year were the I.,yceum Course 
and the May Festival. How eagerly we looked forward to the Lyceum num- 
bers, foi-, not only wert' they interesting, but tiiey enableil us to miss several 
class periods. 



] 









HM* 



It would have been difficult to find a class containing more representatives 
in all the different ])hases of high school life — literary, social and athletic — 
than ours in our Sophomore year. Especially did we prove our athletic 
prowess, for we were all represented on the varsity squad and a Sophomore cap- 
tained the team. 

Again, in our Junior year, hard luck walked hand in hand with us, for new 
subjects were added to our curriculum. 

This turn of fortune would have "downed" almost any class, but the Junior 
Class of 192;} was made of sterner stuff. To show our love for the j)resent 
Senior Class, w'e entertained them with a delightful party at Tubman. We, in 
turn, as future Seniors of Tubman, were entertained by the College Club. 

At last we are the Seniors of Tubman — but — where are our Senior privi- 
leges.'' We have none. Indeed, the privilege of exemption from exams has, 
during our last year, been taken away from the Senior Class. There are very 
few girls in our class who have ever had to stand exams, so it was exceedingly 
hard to become accustomed to this ordeal. We had no time to feel our great- 
ness, having to study for exams instead. But we have proved true to our 
motto, "We will find a way or make one," and in no respect has our record 
failed to reach the high standards of our predecessors. For sincerity and 
earnestness of pur])ose arc certainly the characteristics of the Senior Class of 
1924i, and may these characteristics carry each and every one safely tiirough 
life's trials and tribulations, as they have led us safely through our high school 
defeats and triumphs. 

— Ruth Hardin, Ex. ''2-i. 



Last Will and Testament 

Vw^K, THE SENIOR CLASS of Tubman Hi^rh School, City of Au<.u.stii. 
^ ■ ^ Count V of Kiihiiioiul. Statu of (icor^ia. heiu^ weak and feebk' in Ixxiy. 
\.M^ vi't of sound and disposing mind and memory : and forced now in our 
ileclinin^ days to realize that our five years of mental and piiysical anguish will 
soon be over; for the ])ur])ose of making known our wishes concerning the last 
sad rites to be observed over our remains ; to provide for the comfort and safety 
of tliose who are dependent on us ; to dispose of our worldly ])ossessions in a 
lawful manner ; to express our gratitude to those who have extended a helping 
hand and softened our falls in this cruel world; and for all other ])urposcs that 
the law may deem right and necessary, do hereby declare and ordain this to 
be our last will and testament : 

ITE]\I I. To Miss Leonora Ivey we becjueatii Senior B's "family comb" 
and a sixty cents cutex set. 

ITP^AI IL To Miss Nachman we leave a megajjhone to aid her in calling 
study hall rolls. 

ITEM III. To Miss Norwood we leave a jjair of tweezers. 

ITEM IV. To Miss Kinnear we leave a complete set of Ethel M. Dell's 
works for use in her English classes, hoping that she will persuade Mr. Garrett 
to add these to the library. 

ITEM IV. Realizing Miss (ireen's desire to get thin, we leave to her a 
five pound box of Hollingsworth's "I'nusual Chocolates."" 

ITEM \l. To Miss Frank and Miss Chiles we lea\e one |)air of electric 
curling tongs. 

ITEM VII. To iliss Eve we betjueath six ])airs of rubber heels, ho])ing 
said articles will soften her footsteps along the halls. 

ITEM VIII. To Jliss Comey we leave a jiarrot whose entire vocabulary 
consists of the word, "Why." 

ITEM IX. To Miss Abernathy we wish to leave our sincere ajjprcciation 
and love for her helj) and advice and as a constant reminder of our class we 
leave her a box of all day suckers that she may live her ciiildhood days over 
again. 

ITEM X. To the library we be(]ueath our most priceless ])osession, 
Sarah Ridlehoover, better known as "Major Hoople," The Walking Dic- 
tionary." 



ITEM XI. To all teachers who are in favor of exams for all Seniors we 
leave our gratitude and desire to assure them as never before that we realize 
the wisdom of their decision. 

ITEM XII. To our three assistants who gather in the office we leave a 
year's subscription to the "Whizbang." 

Realizing that tokens of love and aj)j)rcciation should be bestowed on the 
living rather than on the dead, we leave the following articles to members of the 
class of 1925 : 

To the entire Junior Class the Senior Class leaves the privilege of taking 
all exams. 

To Lucy Goodrich Henry we leave a })air of Kress "earbobs" and a triple 
compact. 

To Ruby Whaley we leave a "Ma ! Ma !" doll to satisfy her simple and 
childlike desires. 

To Alice Sunnners we leave a year's subscription to "Photoplay," hoping 
this will stimulate her interest in the movies. 

To all supjjortcrs of Darwin's Theory of Evolution we leave one Elizabeth 
Oliver, known as "Little Osmosis, The Monkey Girl, The Long-sought-for 
Missing Link." Her sighs are almost human. 

To Vclma Bell we leave the daily delivery of one package of peanuts, thereby 
saving her a trijj to the lunchroom. 

To Mary Woodall we leave a bottle of the choicest bugs, hoping these will 
satisfy her dainty ta.stes. 

To Mary Brown we leave an alarm clock to enable her to get to school on 
time. 

To Katherinc Wiggins we leave a book entitled "How I Overcame Bash- 
fulnes.s," by Sarah Dowling. 

For the purpose of disposing of all other property not here-in-before be- 
queathed we appoint our faithful janitors, Mose Green and Austin Morman. 

Done in the year of our I^ord, one thousand nine hundred twenty-four. 

Katharyn Schumacher, Testator. 
Witnesses : 
Eva, 
Mattie, 
Hattie. 




w 



H\'rS tliis?" we exclaimed in unison, we referring to myself and my two fr'ends, 
.Madaline and Dorothy. The cause of our excitement was a -yfic Yi'rk Times," 
the head-lines of which read: 

"SPECIAL TONIGHT AT THE KNICKERBOCKER THEATRE. 

"Review of Tuhman Class of 1924— Moving Photography liy Radio." 

Under this was an explanation of the marvelous scientific discovery by Madame R. Fin- 
klestein. 

"Not Rose''" Dorothv said, as we wound our way Knickerbocker-ward. But. it was none 
other than our old friend" who had made a small fortune from her wonderful mvention. 

"Yes, girls," said Rose, "I got in toucli with every one of our class by radio, except you 
three. Where have you been?" 

"That's a secret," we replied, having sworn to keep our former experiences to ourselves. 

"Girls the first public appearance of mv radio pictures begins at eight this evening I 
have a box reserved for n.y old Tubman friends, so don't be late," called Rose as she rushed 
to a meeting of the foremost inventors of the decade. 

As the heavv velvet curtains parted at the Knickerbocker Theater the night of this great 
event, there wer'e four very excited former Tulmianites waiting expectantly to see the effect 
that the years had had on their old school mates. 

The first scene was an expensively furnished office, and a small bit of feminity signing a 
paper. A man was standing close by with an expression of relief on his face as she signed 
the contract. At the same n.oment, I recognized the girl as Natalie Merry .nul the man as 
Flo Ziegfield. Evidently Natalie is going into the Follies. 

Like a page from ".lo's Bovs" was the next flash, for there, surrounded by a group of 
children, was Eleanor Morris, who is a second ,Io in her Orphan A.sylum. By the way, I 
noticed Eleanor had a sylph-like form-lucky girl, she mu.st have been working hard 

Another crowd of children arrested our attention, but they were this time in a school- 
r,.om. Onie Hixson was going from one group of children to another, showing them how to 
cut out and paste pajn-r. 
town, Augusta, Georgia. 



She is a kindergarten tcaclicr at the Woodlawn 



A small shop on Fifth Avenue made us even more interested than betore. An attractive 
siL'n read "Henna \-illa." On one side were several small compartments where women were 
having their hair .banged to a glorious shade of henna. Searching for the proprietors we 
found Ruth Hardin, taking life easy in her rushing business. So Ruth is a dyer of hair-1 



wonder if she is still a breal<er of liearts? I 
noticed another familiar figure operating a jier- 
nianent hair-waver — none other than C'atlierine 
Helding. So she is Ruth's curler — no wonder 
her own tresses were always so immaculately 
curled. 

The next scene took us to an estate in Eng- 
land, and there, on a sunny tennis-court, was 
Margaret Lockhart. Pardon nie — Ladtf some- 
body; she married a nobleman, and is evidently 
very happy. Her face reflected her happiness. 
Oh, yes, her husband is on the court also. 
I was so interested in Margaret I almost for- 
got him. 

"Lucia Xorris is not really the trainer of the 
I'nited States Basketball Team !" we exclaimed, 
as we saw her little figure on the screen. But 
sure enough, we were not mistaken. She was the 
trainer and, from the reports, quite an able 
.one. I also heard she was an able housewife 
for a celebrated athlete. I wonder? 

An adorable little farm house wliich now 
came into view naturally made us feel that one 
of our class-mates had married a farmer. How- 
ever, our supposition was wrong, for there, in 
a field, we saw three girls dressed in overalls. 
They were Lucile WHiitlock, Louise Wren and 
Julia Rheney, who run the most up-to-date 
truck farm in their part of the country. 

But, ah ! one member is married and lives in 
an etiually adorable farm house. She is .lennie 
Claire Steed. I noticed a little girl in the yard; 
I wonder if she is .Jennie Claire, Jr.? She 
looked very much as if she might be. 

The next flash was of the Opera House in 
Paris. There, on the stage, was a vision of 
loveliness playing a violin. The house was 
packed, and every face reflected the beauty of 
Dorothy's playing. So Porothy Pund has made 
a wonderful success; but it is no surprise, for 
she was always a success. While the radio 
pictures showed Dorothy playing, the radio in 
the theatre broadcasted her nmsic. 

We were brought ba<'k to earth by the change 
in scenery. Instead of the well-filled theater 
in Paris was a packed school room in another 
])art of the same city. Blanche Jones, as the 
head of the English department in this school, 
was helping the little Frenchmen learn our 
language. 

"Ah ! King Tut's tomb," we thought, as the 
next scene fla.shed on the screen. But, no, some 
other old Egy])tian's tomb. That of King 
Limiiurger, about whom we had heard so much. 
The discoverer was Sarah Tanenbaum, who is 




Would TKe 
Fo)lie<a Do 



Vl + hout 



? 





iJ 



r-- 





an excavator of ancient tombs. So it was 
Sarali wlio brought King Lini to the light and 
started tlie Lim craze. 

We wondered who the l)eauty of our class 
was, as we saw indications of a lieauty contest 
taking place. Of course it was Addie Mun- 
day; she is still as pretty as ever and winning 
laurels by her beauty. By the way, she repre- 
sents Miss America in the world-wide contest. 

A pathetic scene was the next. That of the 
slums on the East Side of New York. Two 
kind young ladies were doing their part to 
relieve the suffering in that gruesome section. 
They were Annie Sue Brawner and Mattie Mae 
Morris. We noticed a small band and a large 
diamond on the third finger of each girl's 
hand. Wonder who the lucky men are? 

To the slojiing, sliady lawns of a Spanish 
villa, on the outskirts of Buenos Aires, the next 
flash took us. On the lawn beneath the tropi- 
cal palms was a grouji of dancers, lovely in 
their filmy costumes. But our attention was 
innnediately attracted to the central figure, 
which was grace itself. Lucile Meyer. After 
all, she didn't settle in Aiken, but maybe he 
.settled in Buenos Aires. 

The next scene was such an entirely different 
one from the last that the contrast was beau- 
tiful. St. Moritz, Switzerland, with the winter 
sports at their height. Every nniscle was 
tense, and every eye in the audience was 
strained as a little form, dressed in white 
knickers, white sweater and a white tarn, poised 
on the edge of a mountain of snow and glided 
into a snow-bed below. On close observation 
we found the girl to be Mary Mercer Jackson, 
who had .iust won the skiing championship for 
the United States in the National Olympics. 

"Les Petits Chapeaux" we read on a shop 
that looked as if it might be in the Bon Air- 
Vanderbilt in Augusta. Sure enough, it was, 
and we saw that the proprietress was Made- 
moiselle Dorette d'Evanyees. Looking inside, 
we found Dorothy Evans, a petite girl of our 
former school days. 

A very entrancing studio, evidently in Green- 
wich Village, naturally made us wonder. But 
soon our wonderings were at an end for we 
found Elizalicth Kleiner in an artists' smock 
jviinting gay pictures. After all, Elizabeth 
fulfilled our suppositions as she was always 
artistic. 

The next view took us to Tubman's Commer- 
cial Department. We could hear some one 
saying, "Any questions.* Take out a ))iece of 
paper and a pencil." Miss HoUingsworth's 



successor was no other thiin Laura Quinn. 
Laura had not only acquired Miss HoUings- 
worth'.s ]iosition luit also all of her efficient 
habits. 

Next we were jrreeted liy a frroiip of models 
who held us spelll>ound liy tlie most attractive 
creations both in hats and dressinfi apparel. 
Innnediately we recalled our talented class 
dressmaker and milliner; these models were ad- 
vertising "Morgan's Smart Sets," which are 
owned exclusively liy our old school chum, Lil- 
lian Morgan. 

"Many missionaries needed in Japan. Miss 
Lindsey Buck saves many lives by her faithful 
service," was the headline of the Augusta 
Chronicle. So I,indsey did obtain her life's 
ambition to become a missionary; only she 
nuist have changed lier mind al)0ut going to 
Alaska and having an Eskimo romance. 

Who is this fair miss dancing so gracefully 
on her toes? Can it l)e our friend, Kunice? 
No one would have ever thought that ten years 
would change our most modest and reserved 
school mate into a Hii)]>odrome dancer. With- 
out Eunice Chapnum the Hipjiodrome could 
not hope to succeed. 

"Augusta Gas Company. We will .send a 
man immediately to connect your gas stove. 
You are welcome." We easily recalled the 
polite manner and quiet dignity of our friend, 
Marie. Marie Guy coiitimies to plea.se every- 
one; it appears to lie part of her life's am- 
bition. 

"May I make an announcement, Mr. Garrett? 
The varsity squad will stay for practice this 
afternoon at 3 o'clock." It must be Miss Ivey 
continuing to make announcements. Alas ! 
when the face was turned it revealed the one of 
Eunice Sawilowsky. Eunice took a course in 
physical training, came back to supplant Miss 
Ivey, and is now coaching the famous all-star 
basketball team of Tuliman. 

"What glorious imisic !" remarked Mary and 
Madaline. The nuisic was coming over the 
radio and Thomjison's Sympliony (Irehestra was 
playing. Adelaide Tliom])son is its able direc- 
tor, so we do not marvel at the band's being in 
demand all over the world. 

The extraordinary amount of traffic that 
passes Fifth Avenue and Broadway is New 
York's latest problem. The city is aware of 
the fact that it is not a case of necessity but 
only because a fair, lilue-eyed miss directs the 
traffic. She has well deserved the name, "The 
Best Loved Cop in the United States." Her 






picture was ilis])layed to us and it was tliat of 
our smiling and ever-willing friend, Annie 

Elliott. 

The Augusta Herald had as its headline, 
"Ghost Mystery Discovered. A noted speaker 
who is originally of Augusta will address a 
large Crowd at tlie Inii)erial Theater, Friday, 
at 5 o'clock." Wlien we read this Madaline 
could not renicnilier, and Mary protested that 
she niigl'it make a liad guess as to who tliis 
would be. However, I had not forgotten the 
oral coMi])osition days in Miss Comey's room 
when our teetli were made to chatter and knees 
tremble by the ghost stories of our class orator, 
Maxine. For further infornuition read the 
"Ghost Monthly," published by Maxine Miller. 

After jiincliing ourselves and finding that we 
were still very much awake, we noticed a 
throng of ])eo])le gathering around a great rock. 
On to)) of this rock was a dainty miss trying 
to imitate Mary Pickford in the play of old, 
Kosita. She was strununing her banjo and 
singing most effectively- A note of explana- 
tion was that Miss Ella Mae Gunter had been 
asked to interpret that part because of her 
pleasing voice. Ella Mae is a prima donna in 
grand opera. 

"Today is Monday, Monday bread and but- 
ter, Tuesday string beans." I don't know 
whether shallow or great minds run in the 
same channel, but we all exclaimed in one tone, 
"Hasn't Miss Halbert forgotten that school 
chant yet?" Evidently Miss Halbert had, but 
Annie I>ee had not since she was directing the 
Tubmanites of UY.H. Annie Lee was a member 
of the Tubman 192+ Glee Club and we are in- 
clined to believe her many pensive poses at 
school were all about how she would obtain 
Miss Halbert's position. Well, she has suf- 
ficed her desires and is considered one of the 
ablest nnisic directors Tollman has ever pos- 
sessed. 

The next scene was an ajipropriate one for 
any love .story. At a distance could be seen 
two lovers gamboling beneath the blue sky. 
We were informed that it was the noted Mr. 
Gonzalos and his bride, who were enjoying a 
belated honeymoon in the Golden West. Mrs. 
Gonzalos had been the secretary of the Cion- 
zalos Tobacco firm until she had completely 
captivated the president with her alluring per- 
sonality. Enter Mrs. Gonzalos, in the past 
Marion Andrews. 

We were fascinaleil by the act which fol- 
lowed. Many hapjiy chil»ln-n were dancing 
around their youthful teacher. Have we for- 











J. 



gotten the t*le\'er contriver wlio studied tiie 
least and yet sueeeeded in iin))i'essinfr the 
teacher as knowinff tlie most? Louise continues 
to pursue her old hohby, dancing; only now she 
receives ])ecuniary compensation for her ability 
as a dancing teacher. 

Once more we had a glimpse at the t'om- 
mercial Department of Tubman. In there we 
saw a teacher o])ening the four books of 
original entries on the l)lackboard; no doubt it 
was exp"ianation for more stu|)id students. 
Next we asked Miss Davis who taught her 
when she attended Tubman. We found that 
Edna was teaching bookkeeping; she always 
made the low mark of 99 in 1924. 

A thrilling event was then displayed. An 
immense aeroplane was Hying over the heart 
of the city of Augusta. The aviatrix was no 
other than Sarah tireen. Sarah had perfected 
a new plane, modern in every way, and an im- 
provement over the others. A daring young 
damsel did various terrifying stunts while she 
held on to the moving plane with one hand. 
When the plane landed, the brave Miss was 
found to be Lillian Hogan. Lillian is assisting 
Sarah in advertising her new invention. 

The next scene showed us a "petite" figure, 
at an immense desk, whom I did not at first 
recognize. But as she dropped her head in a 
characteristic pose, I realized that it was 
Sarah Emma Ridlehoover, still writing. 
Rose explained that she is sixm to jiublish "The 
Philosophy of Originality," which bids fair to 
be "tlie book of the decade." We all inuuedi- 
ately resolved to buy a first edition. I, for one, 
had always wondered how Sarah Euuua did it. 

We saw, following this, a dainty dancer 
picking her way across the street, on a rope 
strung dangerously high. As she turned to 
make her concluding bow we all cried, "Alice 
Carswell." 

Suddenly the band struck u)) "The Sheik," 
that mucli aluised air of 19'22, and we all won- 
dered what in the world could be coming next. 
There was flashed on the screen the lone figure 
of a woman crossing the desert on a camel, and 
as she turned to see the horizon, we recognized 
Louise Halk. Dorothy whispered something 
about a recent article which jiroclaimed her the 
leading "archeologist" of the day. 

We were brought back to the familiar l)y the 
view of tlie interior of a law office. At two 
similar desks, there were seated two business- 
like figures whom we recognized as the Dowl- 
ings (both were engrossed in huge volumes of 




Ca>-o ly n Loo ks 




c<&? 




something or ullit-r). "Steiuifrriiphers?" I put 
it as a question, and Hose silently answered l)y 
pointinfr toward the door, where there was a 
sijrn, "Lowling and Howling; Partners at Law," 
We wondered if tliey ever (juarreled over which 
was the Senior member? Tlien some one vol- 
unteered the information that Elizal)eth was 
en^a^ed, and would be married soon, to a red- 
headed light-house keeper. 

Our attention was then drawn to a large 
baseball field. The crowd was wildly cheering 
as the "man-u])"' was just eonijileting a home 
run. But the "man-uji" proved to be none 
other than Huth Hinton. Induced by her love 
for the game, she had refused to let her sex 
interfere. Also, it is rumored that she and the 
manager were engaged. 

And Katherine Moore? We saw her making 
a speeeii to Congress, for she is the first woman 
President. No doul)t this was brought about 
by her early interest in ])olitics, acquired in 
Miss Flisch's room. By the way, Katherine 
went in on the Democratic ticket. 

Suddenly someone gasped; I looked and 
gas])ed, too. For there was Roselle Rosen- 
thal in the nu)st ardent embrace of some young 
blonde man. Oh! but just as the situation l)e- 
came most interesting, I remembered seeing 
that Koselle was to try out for a particularly 
dramatic part in one of New York's latest 
dramas. Well, judging from Hoselle's ability 
to make love, we would say, "Give her the 
place." 

"First appearance of Madame Rosita Fra- 
sier, the 'Second Paderewski,' " was the head- 
line of the ,\ugusta Herald. Here's hoping 
that the i)erformance will be better attended 
than most of such nuisical affairs in .\ugusta 
are. Anyway, our old home town is not hope- 
lessly behind in the musical world with such a 
talented musician as Rosa. 

The next scene was laid in California amid 
lavish colors and gorgeous flowers. There was 
an outdoor class studying French, and we 
could hear the familiar "J' ai, tu as, il a." And 
the interesting young looking teacher was none 
other than Ivy Hixson. Katherine Crawford is 
assisting her for the present, but we under- 
stand that she is soon to leave for Colorado, 
where abides her fiance. 

"What an adorable stucco bungalow!" ex- 
claimed Mary, and it was, indeed. But the in- 
side was even more entertaining. On a sofa, 



Carolyn was telling fairy stories, to two of the 
most cunning children, a hoy and a girl, with 
the straightest black hair imaginable. Caro- 
lyn's husband entered, and we innnediately un- 
derstood "the wherefore" of the black hair. By 
the way, Harriet Alexander designed Carolyn's 
bungalow. We understand that she is making 
(piite a success of it, and that all the society 
elite are having their homes designed by Har- 
riet. 

"America to be represented at Olynqiic 
Games by a fornu'r -Vugustan, Miss Elizabeth 
Oliver," proclaimed the head-lines of an article 
in the A'cK' York 'rinits. We did not have 
time to read the article itself, but we are all 
betting on America. We know how Eliza- 
beth's ability is from past experience. 

And just as we were beginning to wonder 
where Elizabeth Kreps could be, there was 
flashed on the screen an odd-looking room 
which ])roved to be that of an inventor. Eliza- 
beth was busily engaged with some queer- 
looking fluids, which Rose explained were very 
poisonous. Elizalieth works with poisonous 
gases in the Dejiartment of War, V. S. A. We 
know that she is an invaluable em])loyee, for 
she makes herself invaluable in any place. 

The next scene was indeed puzzling. Kath- 
aryn Schumacher was standing on a platform, 
surrounded by a crowd of ])eople who all 
seenu'd to look upon her as the eighth wonder. 
"How is that?" many asked Dorothy. Tile 
latter looked puzzled for a moment, and then 
lauglied as she jiointed out a car which stood 
behind Katharyn on the i)latform. She said, 
"Katharyn has made a better car at a lower 
price than Ford has ever been able to make. 
Tlierefore, she is the beloved of millions, the 
liated of few (the few who have bought one 

of her cars.)" 

» * * * * 

As the curtains came together, we all turned 
to congratulate Hose on the invention, but we 
found that she had slipped out during the last 
scene. Consequently there was notliing left to 
do but wend our way homeward, all the while 
discussing the class of '24, which we voted as 
one of the best; and, as someone concluded: 

"When we've claimed eternal s])lendor. 
And found Eternal Youth, 
Thanks be to you, dear Tubman High, 
Who taught Eternal Truth." 

Mad.m.ink Green, '24. 
Dorothy Eevy, '24, 

M.VHV Pl.UMB, '24. 




Tubman 



Exemptions 

(All Subject.^) 
■i- + 



Andrews, Marion 
Balk. Lonise 
Dowlins. Kli/aljeth 



SENIOR 

Hintun. Huth 
Hixson. Ivy 
Levy. Dorothy 
l.ockliart. Margaret 



Moore, Katherine 
Schumacher. Katharyn 
Tanenbaum. Sarah 



Andrews. Rebecca 
Bell. Vehna 
Henry. Lucy tJoudrich 
King. Margie 



JUNIOR 



Lester. Martha 
Miller, (iladys 
Tearl. Kosina 
Quinn, Susie 
Sawilowsky. Belle 



Skinner. Bessie 
Wall. Ida 

Wescoat, Marguerite 
Wiggins. Katherine 



Carswell, \'era 
Davidson. Jean 
Downing, Cleminie 
Kiske. Mary 
Fleming, Virginia 



SOPHOMORE 

(lairctt. Mildred 
Howard, Langliorne 
Hntdieson, Ola 
JoTies, Elizabeth 
Kuhlke, Blanche 
\eary. Mera 



Rogers. \'oncile 
Sawilowsky, Estelle 
Schneider, Heline 
Tanenbaum. Minnie 
Warner, Elizabeth 



Allen, Elsie 
Crooke. Ethel 
Davidson, Lila 



FRESHMAN 

Edwards. Florrie 
(iarrett. Louise 
Hankinson, Stella 
Hildebrandt, Marguerite 
Hixson. Vera 



Stuart, Virginia 
Van Pelt, Lois 
Wiggins, Ruby 



Blanchard. Mary Emma 
Cleckiey. Coiuun- 
Cooper, (lertrnde 



SUB-FRESHMAN 

Derri:k, Harriet 
Ferguson, Elizabeth 
Minnis, Margaret 



Robinson, Laura 
Wall, Thehna 
Young, Margaret 




To the Boys of the A. R. C. 

Here's to your pluck and your spirit. 

Here's to your daring and wit, 
Here's to tlic boys who are ready ; 

Boys who never quit. 

Here's to your studious habits 

In consuming the michiight oil, 
Here's to your love of fairness, 

The spirit in which you toil. 

Whether at basket or baseball. 

Football or track vou work, 
Vou do it with ready will. 

Smiling, you never shii'k. 

So here's to the boys of A. R. C. 
May your troubles never begin. 
May the days be bright and joyous 
For our Nation's future men. 

— Madai.ine Green, '24. 



Soliloquy of Diana 



XT WAS iiiicliiiglit, and all thu clocks were striking. 
The closed eyes fluttered open, color came into the clieeks and the 
iiniiiobile body trembled sliglitly. Diana, the crstwiiile stui'dv statue 
in the liall of Tubman High School, was Diana the living goddess for just a 
night. 

"Ah," she whisjiered softly. "Quiet I I'L very thing is quiet. Such a tlif- 
ference between the noisy building of tiie morning and tiie (juiet now I" She 
uttered a low throaty laugli as she remembered some of her past experiences 
in "that noisy building." 

"Those girls — those dear careless, carefree girls I They are so different 
and yet so vitally alike, tiie girls of all times. Different, yes, how different ! 
WouldiTt the simple girls of Ephesus iiave died to see tiie loads of books tiiese 
girls carry! Dear me. how tiiey fuss! Yoterday a little bobbed-haired Fresh- 
man remarked bitterly as she [passed me : 'I don't see what gt)od Latin docs 
anybody, anyway. And goodness ! what a lot of Latin Miss Dora gave us to 
translate. I'll never do it! Oh, mercy!" Poor child: such a lot of little 
worries! Besides lessons and school, the girls of today dress so differently 
from tlie Greek maidens of long ago — with their flowing robes. Oh, these com- 
plicated Modern Dresses — I should never get into one ! But really I do like 
the bright colors ; they look so cheerful and young. There is a lot to be said 
of the girls of today, but I cannot be<ir the ])aint on their faces. It makes 
some of them look so grotesque. I was very much insulted when they jiainted 
me with their rouge and li])stick. How ugly I must have looked! I remember 
one of the girls saving. 'She looks sortu human now." 



"Ridiculous!" Shu lau<>-lR'(l a l)it, tlifU continuud. "I am so glad that the 
g-irls of this, my school, like to run and jump and throw. Yesterday I heard 
a tall slender Sopiioniore tell her friend that she hoped the Sophs, would win 
the cujj in Field Meet. How like tlie competition in races and discus throw- 
ing contest.s in Greece ! 

"But, yes, a great many things are going to liH])j)en in a few weeks, besides 
the Field Meet. The Juniors are all excited oyer their Dutch Operetta and the 
grave and dignified Seniors are f()re\er talking of Connnencement. 

"I've heard the plans of many a t'ommencement celebration and each June 
I think — surely this Senior Class is the best of all ! Tiiey are so enthusiastic 
and happy. 

"Ah, certainly my lot is a hajjpy one, watching each ilay the flood of young 
girlhood ])ass through the halls of Tubman out into the world of dreams and 
success !" 

— M.\iu:auet Johnson, '25. 




'/Vo5<- <z.vQry sub's hoLycf 




Shh! 

i 4 ^^w^ OTHER, please tell us a storv," begged Margie. 

"Would you like for nie to read a bit from Aunt Mary's diary, 
that she had when she was sixteen, instead?" 

"Do! We're just crazy to see what siie thought when she was our age. 

"This page looks rather interesting. It is dated May 7, 192-1;. Be quiet 
while I read. 'I practiced all this afternoon for "The Magic Wheel." Of 
course, when I started to say my part, I forgot the beginning, just as I always 
do. The play will be tomorrow nigiit and I nuist learn it before then !' " 

"I wonder if she did learn it," mused Margie. 

"Hurry and read the next page," ordered George. 

"We want to see what happened at the play," chimed in the two. 

She continued reading: "'The Junior play is over. How relieved I am! 
What haj)pened at it will take more than one page. So if you will let me. 
Diary, I will use tomorrow's page also. Before I left iionie, I reviewed my 
part over and over again so as to be certain to remember it, but several times 
I had to look on my copy to see how the speech started. We left home early 
in order that I would have time to dress, but once started, we decided to take 
an automobile ride. The result was that it was seven-fifty when the automo- 
bile rolled up to Tubman. The curtain was to go up at eight o'clock. I rushed 
to get dressed and finislied just in time for my part. Emma pushed me on the 
stage. 

"'I looked around. Now, how did my s])eecli begin? Oh! tliis is it. I 
started. This was the noblest — No! No! I was all wrong, for tliat was what 
I was learning the other day in "Julius Caesar." 



" 'If I liad looked around to see the setting and tlie witch it would have 
been all right. But did I do this? No! I saw nothing but people chatting in 
the balcony, where I would have liked to be. Turning niv head to the side, I 
saw Miss Halbert trying to direct me, but I couldn't tell what she was saying. 
My brain would not work; it was a blank. Then all was quiet. I couldn't 
say anything; I was dumb-founded, and the rest of the show depended on 
what I had to say ! I thought of the saying, "Speech is silver but silence is 
golden," but I didn't think the audience would take it that way. 

"The stillness was suddenly broken by a ))iping voice in the audience. 
"Mamma, I want the show to start." It was followed by a "shh !" from his 
mother. That was it. It was "shh" I wanted to remember. I then said my 
speech without any hesitation whatsoever. The show was a success. But 
what would I have done if that mother had not said "shh".'" " 

— Rebecca Andrews, '25. 




The ^ma-C'm/TW.SpeciaV 



The Way of A Maid 



■t + 



oil. just for the joy of living! 

Fill writing to toll to the world 
I'm glad that I'm here to shout it, 
"No longer am I a young girl !" 

II. 

I've had a hard road to travel 

AVith lessons and homework galore. 

Hut now its all gone forever. 

And school work will haunt me no more. 

III. 

I'll spend every night a dancing, 

May get me a "fellow" or two. 
Then spend a few years in playing — 

With lessons and homework, I'm through ! 

IV. 

But there'll be a time a-coining 

(When I've had my fill of gay life), 

To furnish a tiny love nest 

And be just an old-fashioned wife. 

— Dorothy Pixi), '24. 



Varsity Squad 



Eunice Sa\vii,(>wsky Cai>t(iin 

^JARTllA I.FSTKH Hu^ini'ifif MtllHII/fr 

+ ■{• 

FORWARDS 

Ki.iZABHTii Ulivkr R0SEI.1.E U(iSLXTiiA), Hei.ine Scii XEimcu 

EvEi.YN BuHCH Eunice Sawii.owsky Addie Sue Wei.tch 

CENTERS 

Elizabeth Dowling Lucia Xobris 

Dorothy Levy Alice Summers 

GUARDS 

Myra Hilton Uutii Hinton Sarah Dowlimi 

Sarah Eee Ksteli.k Sawiiowsky I.ucii.e Meyer 



Wearers of the T 



h + 



MVUA HILTDN 
Honest, this plntjer is the swiftest piece of tiiiilter 
we hnt^e seen on the floor /h Dwrnj a day. Mijra be- 
liei'es iu that old srif/iitfj, "If at first i/oti don't suc- 
ceed, try, try, again," and believe me! she succeeded 
this year. Woe to the fjay, ymnifj forward whom it 
fell her lot to guard! 



ESTELLE SAWILOWSKV 
The glory of her sister, Eunice, shines from Estelle, 

too. Although she was the baby on the team she 
made her presence felt ! We expect great things 
from her next year. She can utick, get the ball, and 
place it where it ought to be. Go it, Estelle, you 
have the makings of a future star! 



ELIZABETH OLIVER 
Here we wish to present a .^tar of the first magni- 
tude. Whenei'er Elizabeth gets the ball the Tubman 
fans breathe a sigh of relief because they know it 
means another goal. The unfortunate miss who 
guards her has to do some stiff playing. 



ELIZABETH DOWLING 

Elizabeth, the lanky and rangy, has held dotvn 
center for two years. She could not he icith us last 
year on account of "Doctor's orders" and we felt her 
loss keenly. Basket ball is not her only accomplish' 
ment. She is a7i all round athlete. 



« i 




LUCIA NORRIS 

Our little, but lovd, side center has done wonderful 
work this year. She played in all but one game and 
we certainly did miss her then. We missed her so 
that ice nearly lost! You can always depend upon 
Lucia to be at the right place at the right time. 





EUNICE SAWILOWSKY 
To Eunice we award the wicker hath tuh for con- 
sistetit good playing. Never call time on this young 
lady unless her shoe strings give way.' Wherever she 
roams she deals death and destructittn so that ei^ery- 
one steps out of her path. We chose right when we 
made her captain of Varsity, r.'Jk. 























Senior Team 

Eunice Sawilowsky V opt din 

FORWARDS 

El.IZABKTH Ol.IVKR HoSKM.E RoSENTlIAI, SaKAII H IDI.E HOOVER 

KiNICE SaWII-OWSKV 

CENTERS 

Kl.lZAItE'l'M OoWl.lNO J,rfIA NoKHlS J)lH{0'i'HV I.l:\■^ 

GUARDS 

Sarah nowi.iNO Hriii Hixrox J.icii.E Meyer 

Maky Mercer Jackson 



Junior Team 

+ + 

Alice Summers Cfiiilaiti 

+ + 

FORWARDS 
Addie Sue Weltcii Katherixe Wiggins Frances Xorrell 

Frances Fui.i.er 

CENTERS 

Alice Summers Cirayson Wells 

Christine (Ireen Kulalia Miller 

Edna Hevniii.ds 

GUARDS 
Sarah Lee I.auree Ponds Ida Wall 



Sophomore Team 

EsTEi.i.E Sawii.owsky Captain 

FORWARDS 

Hki.ine Schneider Evelyn Burch Minnie Tommins 

CENTERS 

Ai.K'E Spann Ckktiii'dr Beai.e Mary Fletcher 

GUARDS 

Estei.i.e Sawii.owsky- Elizahetii Hill Wii.mina Howland 

IvA Weathersbee 



Freshman Team 

J I'M A Hei.l C/iiitniii 

"i- + 

FORWARDS 
SopliiE Lee ScHNEiuER . Jii.iA 15ei.i. Pearl Shimoff 

CENTERS 
Marianne Ellis MAHiiiEHrrE Hii.debrandt Elizabeth Chandler 

GUARDS 
Helen Littleton Sarah Whitney Catherine N'erdery 

Neil Trowbriiige 





. . 




i 



Basket Ball 

+ + 

B-otli Miss Ivuy and .Miss rhiiikett 

Wei'L' horrified to sec 
\- girl in bloomers witii her stockings 

Rolled below her knee. 
"§-iiy, you," they cried together, 

"This is an insult fine ; 
l^-eeps you off the squad 

And from the 'T' sublime ; 
£-very speck of paint and rouge 

That's ])acked uj)on your face 
'P-akes away your honors 

And lea\es you in disgrace. 

"B-asket ball is for the girl 

Who keeps iier wits alive, 
^-Iwavs liave a cheerful mien — 

Thus help your team to tlirive. 
L-earn to take things as tliev come. 

When playing on the courts ; 
L-et other girls be what they will, 

But 'Tuhmanites' are sjjorts." 

— Ei.izAHETH W. Oliver, '24'. 

She hekl liim close as close could be, 
Lest some one near should take iiim ; 
She watched each move quite cautiously. 
Then found that she must shake him. 

Siie threw iiim ilown so cold and hard — 

Oh, .such a dreadful fall ! 

Her friends all yelled and wriuig their hands — 

Slie'tl dropi)ed the basket ball. 



-D. A. Pl'xd, '24. 




A BasKet-h^w) 



Statistics 



Prettiest Addik Mr n pay 

Most Intellect uul Marion' Axdkews 

Most Stylish Litii.k Meyer 

Most Athletie Eunice Sawilowsky 

Wittiest Maky' Pi,umu 

Most Popular Dorothy' Fund 




Prettiest :: Addie Munday 




Mimt I iilcllicliiiil :: Maiiion Andhku's 




Miixl Shilisli :: l.ircii.K iMi;vi:ii 




■Vos/ .1 thief ir :: Krxirr StwiiowsKV 




Wittiest :: Mary Pi.umb 




Most Popular :: Dobothy Pund 




When All the World is Young 

XGELA .stood at tlie little railroad station uatt-hing the train as it 
started slowly oft' and then gradually gathered speed until she could 
see it no more. That was the magic carpet that was taking Rosemary 

to the land of realized dreams, while she — she had been left behind to do nothing 

but wish for the rest of her life. 

With tears of disappointment and sorrow, she turned from the station with 
Beverly, who had l)een ])atiently standing by her side. Though she said noth- 
ing, he knew intuitively where she was going, — to the Sacred Grove, as she and 
Rosemary had named it long ago, because it seemed to have an irresistible 
charm. There on the hilltop the pines seemed the tallest and the sky the 
bluest. Thither Beverly and Angela went. She always went there when she 
had a battle to fight. She sat down on a bed of pine needles and leaned against 
the biggest pine, with her hands clasped over her head. Beverly threw him- 
self at her feet. How he loved this wonderful girl ! 

No word was spoken for a long time and the silence was broken only by the 
soft whis])er of the ])ines, like the melody of an Aeolian harp. Angela had 
her eyes immovably fixed on the southern sky that gleamed brightly through 
the pinetops. Surely Jason would rather have found hei- in the Sacred Grove 
than the Golden Fleece! She was the ])ersonification of youth, grace and 
beauty as she sat there in a goddess-like j)ose. Her short bobbed hair had 
stolen all the autunmal tints, and her eyes, now blue, now gray, were unlike 
any others in the whole wide world : while her nose, mouth, and chin could not 
have been more delicately or more firmly chiselled by Praxiteles himself. But, 
perchance, had Jason found her there and claimed her, he would have hatl a 
Herculean task in concpiering her flaming, youthful soul. Eventually, Angela 
broke the silence by a rather violent outburst of speech. 

"I don't see why I can't go too !" she exclaimed, almost fiercely. "In this 
little old town I can never, never be anything but plain Angela, while Rose- 
mary — she will have every chance in the world : all honor will be hers, for she 
has already gone out to sec what the world holds for her. But if the world 
has anything for me, I shall never know it. It isn't fail-; it isn't fair! Why 
is it that some peoj^le get everything, and others nothing.''" She looked at 
Beverly defiantly. He knew the mood and gave her a reproachful look. 

"Ah, it isn't that I am jealous of Rosemary," she went on, "for I love her 
too much for that, and if she fails, her failure will only make my disa])])oint- 
ments unbearable. No," she said more thoughtfullv, sorry for her burst of 



emotion, "it really i^sl^t that I loiitr for fame and fortune; I siniplv want to 
live my life. I want to follow a star, to get in the game, to sail on the ship, 
and to satisfy the longings of my soul ! The world is calling to youth, and if 
youth doesn't answer the summons, soon it will hurry by, looking back with a 
sardonic, supercilious jeer. Everything will be lost, for the Golden Age 
comes but once in every life. But I am doomed to live here forever. The 
world will go on by, and oh, how I want to join the throng — to work, to lose 
myself in work, and just add something to the world. It is so beautiful, so 
lovely, and I want to search for the Beautiful too." 

Angela felt her heart throb violently. The Beautiful lay at her feet. She 
looked down into tie lovely little town now growing dim a.s the Master hand 
turned the glowing castles into softer colors. 

"Is it true that love is the only thing after all.'" she said softly. I am so 
3'oung, but my intentions are strong, and you know that Hilary loves me." 
All was changed now. 

Beverly could not speak. How he loved her, too ! 

Angela was silent again, but her thoughts were far hapj)ier ; love had called 
forth all the beautiful in her. She saw a little white cottage, with a fairy roof, 
nestled under the sheltering care of a large, graceful fir tree, at the foot of 
which grew bright, red ])0])pies. A little white gate opened into a small garden, 
full of old-fashioned flowers, through which a little flagstone path led to the 
steps of the fairy-like cottage. Dainty curtains fluttered at the windows, a 
cheerful fire shone from within, out in the dusk; little fairy figures danced 
through the cottage. The little gate opened. A beloved figure appeared — 
the king of the tiny domain. The queen opened the door of the cottage and 
hurried lightly down the flagstone walk to meet him. This was the incarnation 
of love, truth, and beauty; all else was as naught. The world did not scorn 
such as this; it gave it its greatest blessing, for nothing is greater than love. 

Angela arose suddenly. "I long for nothing now, I have caught the vision 
of the Beautiful," she said. "All I how could I ever have been so blind.'' I 
know now that Hilary is the world, ami everything that is in it, to me." 

"Vou understand, don't you, Beverly.'''' she (juestioned, with all the afi^ection 
of her lovable nature. ".\n(l I ]oxv vou, also, but I suppose I shall have to 
give you u)) sometime." 

I'oor Beverly I He had loved her at first sigiit, with an undying love. He 
vould do anything for this girl wiiom lie worshi])])ed, but some ilay she would 
be Hilary's forever. But such was his fate, for Beverly was only a dog. 

S.-M!.\H Ru)LEHOOVEK, "24. 



" Maybe? " 



Maybe I'll study my lessons to-day. 

And maybe I'll learn them, too ; 
Maybe I'll stay to basketball 

One time 'fore the season's through. 

Maybe my "trig" '11 be right ; you know- 
It's awfully hard to get ; 

And maybe I'll answer "Bugology" too — 
Oh, I may even do that yet. 

Maybe Miss Page won't call on me, 

She might look over my head ; ■* 

So I won't even have to study a word 

Tliat "Henri Quatre" has said. 

^ Bi'T Wait ! -=^^ 

Maybe they all will call on me — 

Oh, Heavens! what would I do.'' 
On second thought, I'll settle down. 

And study my lessons through. 

Then maybe they'll ask me something I know — 

A little bit surer way; — 
And if I don't get called on at all, 

I'll have a ha]i]>ier day. 

'Cause "Mayhes" are rather uncertain, you see, 

In this old world so bright. 
And the safest ])lan's to study hard, 

So (MAYBE) you can answer right. 

M.^D.^LixE Greex, '2-1. 



Our Friends, the Trees 

XT is a fasciiiiitiiig tinner to study tlio faces and porsonalitius of people 
wliom \vc meet on the street, but do we often think of tlie j)ersonalities 
of trees? There are different types of trees, just as there are dif- 
ferent types of ])eople, and each iias its own indivitkiality. 

What is more charming than a peach tree in April? It is like a voung 
girl, delightfully dainty in a soft pink dress. The silver maples are young 
girls, too, but they are of a different tyjje. Their mannei' is lively and they 
are always laughing and casting twinkling glances at passers-by. 

Then, too, there is oui' old friend, the oak. How rugged and stauncli he 
is, not easily led into conversation, but always firm and true. 

What gracious and cultured trees the elms and sycamores are. They are 
well aware of tiieir charm, too, and iiold themselves with conscious dignity. 

A maple tree reminds me of a gypsy, dully red in the spring and gloriously 
red and gold when autumn comes. Like a gypsy, too, it flaunts its beauty by 
the streams and on the hills. 

\Ve have all seen jieople like the Lombai'dv jjoplars. Thev are aristocratic 
old ladies, very ])rim, i)ut much given to gossip, and thev go into a flutter of 
excitement over every breeze that passes. 

The hickories are a delightful tribe. When young, they are slender and 
graceful, but strong like gallant kniglits in story-books, and even after they 
grow old they are courtly and dignified, and cast a hosjiitable shade about them. 

A cedar of Lebanon always ri'ininds me of a winter girl, bundled up in furs, 
with only a pair of laughing eyes showing undei- her close fitting caj). 

And, last of all, there is the pine. ^Vho can describe the ])ersonalitv of a 
pine tree, the noblest tree that grows? Dignified, yet friendly and always sing- 
ing a low, soft song. A stately })ine tree calls to mind a person of {)ure tlioughts 
and high ideals. The very sight of a pine tree drives the clouds from mv brain 
and makes me think of clear stars and bracing winds. 

One migiit go on foi-ever, describing these woodland and wayside friends, 
whose natures are as varied and interesting as those of our human friends, and 
if we cultivate their acquaintances, we need never be lonely. 

— Velma Bell, '25. 



.■^ 



What A Girl Told Me 



* * 







— Q 




(ia-O-S^ 



r hat- 
She knew a girl that heard a 
girl say that she would rather 
be Rudie's bootblack than 
President. 

That— 

If Miss Coniey and a liurricane 
had a race, she would liet on 
the hurricane, provided Miss 
Coniey stepped out. 

That— 

The reason so many doctors 
have skeletons in their closets is 
tliat they like to have a reniem- 
lirance of their first patient. 

That— 

A girl said that as soon as she 
could kiss her elbow, she was 
going to buy a collar and a pair 
of socks and niarrv Ennna 
Plunkett. 



That— 

"I eat molasses with my beans, 
I've done it all my life. 
It's not because I love 'em so. 
But it holds 'em on my knife." 

That— 

Statistics show tliat more Subs get mar- 
ried at Christmas tlian any other time. 
Christmas ouglit to come around oftener 
so Mr. (larrett would l)e relieved of a 
good many tr'oubles. 
That--- 

"They sat together in cha]n'l. 

Their heads were closely prcs.'.cd. 
Miss Page ]uinclied Miss Conu'V, 
And .Miss Comey did tlie rest." 

That— 

If Miss 15rad(ly grows any more Tubman 
will have to l)e enlarged. 

That— 

Mr. Ciarrett's di-tinitiim of a marriage 

certificate is: 

"A written contract by which a woman 
is given authority to l)oss a man for 
the rest of liis life." 

ilorat — Exjierience is tlie best tcaclier. 



That— 

Miss Woods had jiistols and 
guns all over her house. Well, 
it has always l)een susjiected that she 
likes having arms around lier. 

That— 

Miss Anderson's French and Miss Com- 
fort's designs are exactly alike. Both 
are beautiful but nobody understands 'em. 

Thai — 

It is a fact that the moon does not affect 
tlie tide — only the untied. 

That— 

Never file letters —always trim theiu witii 
the scissors. 

That- 

Miss Fliseh, when she lived in Wisconsin, 
used to have a little pig named Ink, be- 
cause it was always running out of tlie 

pi'U. 

That— 

Instead of its being, "Maids and a Man," 
don't you wish it were, "Men and a 
Maid." and you were tile Maid? 

That— 

As to the verity of this little column, 
"If you believe it, it's so." 

— Dorothy Bell, '25. 



Which One 

GLICK! The sound of some hard object hitting tlie pavement ! Flverv- 
one sipping liis tea at the Cafe on the Cham})s Elysees looked up. They 
saw a much embarrassed young lady, dressed in green, staring at the 
pavement around her. What was she looking for.'' What had she lost? There 
now, that good looking young man was handing it back to her. It was only a 
locket. 

The uninterested went back to their tea. Some young girls in a far corner 
giggled hysterically. Mothers with young daughters sat uj) and began to 
take notice. This young man, as one mother said to her daughter, looked to 
be a good catch. The rich air he had about him, the romantic way his jet 
black hair waved, the gleam of deviltry in his eyes, and the chivalrous way he 
returned the locket made the girls from sixteen to forty-six sigh with delight. 
Now he was walking away with the young thing with the green dress, green 
locket, and green eyes. 

"A priceless emerald in this locket, I should say," said Jerry Kennedy to 
the alluring thing in green. 

"Quite," she replied : "it belongs to my mother." 

The lady i" green was walking slowly down the street. Jerry walked along 
beside her. 

"Pardon, may I escort you to your destination. Miss — er — er.''" said Jerry. 

"Mademoiselle Dupont," she said, "Hilda Dupont. No, I have been living 
in Paris for nineteen years and I know it (juite well by now. Merci." 

Jerry was cjuite taken back. It was not often that a Kennedy of Kentucky 
was talked to in this manner. He looked up at Mademoiselle and, meeting her 
flasiiing green eyes, said half to himself, "Green, green as grass anywhere except 
in Kentucky." 

"Kentucky !" JVIlle. Dupont had caught the last word. "Were you speak- 
ing of Kentucky.''" 

"Sure thing. That's where I hail from, the old blue grass state." 

"Do you ha])])en to know of a Mr. (ierald Kennedy of Kentucky.''" Made,- 
moiselle Dupont asked. 

"Yes, of course. I'm he," replied Jerry. 

"Oh, no, not you ! Mother knew this man. He was in Paris at least twenty 
years ago." 

"Then it was my father. All of us Kennedys are called Gerald Kennedy. 
It's a custom of the family, you see. There have been nine (ierald Kennedys 
antl they have all come to Paris for six months some time in their lives. It's a 
custom of the family to come to Paris, you see." 

"Yes, I understand about the customs," said Mile. Du])ont. "But is it a 
custom of the family to walk down the boulevard backwards and talk in a loud 
voice.'' Is it also a custom of the family to escort a young lady against her 
wish.'' This is where I was going to get a costume for the ball tonight." 

Jerry was very much embarrassed and told ]Mlle. Du])ont that it was not 
their custom to do these things. Then, making a low bow to Mile. Dui)ont, 



he said, "It has always been a custom of tlie Keniieclvs to take a lady to the 
ball on the first night tliey meet her. Tliere is another reason why I should 
take you. It is because my father knew your mother." 

Allle. Dupont could not refrain from laugliter. She said, "It seems to be 
a custom of the family to have your own way. Yes, I will ^o tonigjit. Mett 
me here at nine. Au revoir." 

"Just one thing more," ])leade(l Jerry. "May I call you Iliida.^" 

"Yes ; au revoir." 

Jerry lifted his hat and walked on tlown the street. He was not thinking 
of the girl he had just met but of Tommy, his childhood sweetheart back home. 

Thomasine Clark had been Jerry's sweetheart and ])laymate since child- 
hood. He had always called lier Tommy because he tiiought tiiat name suited 
her best. Tlie Clarks lived on tiie jilantation next to the Kennedys. Old .Terry 
Kennedy, Jerry's father, had secretly hoped that Jerry would marry Tonnuy. 

All tlie Gerald Kennedys, and there had been nine, were tall, dark, liandsome, 
ronuintic, and adventurous. All had looked alike; yet all looked ditt'erent. All 
had the same characteristics ; yet each had jjortrayed a vividly tlitt'erent char- 
acter. All the Kennedys, as great-grandfather Kennedy had expressed it. 
loved "women, racehorses, and wine." Each of tlie Kennedvs liad spent six 
months in Paris. They had all married beautiful women, and it had become a 
custom of the family that the woman they would marry nnist iiave four char- 
acteristics: She must be haughty, coy, fiery, and, of course, beautiful. 

Old Jerry Kennedy said that Tommy Clark was all these and more, too. 
Had she not been haughty when she called the girls from I^ouisville clown for 
])icking on jioor Anne (iray.'' Had she not ridden the wild horse, "Hoi)," to 
victory in the "Kentucky Derby.'"' Was she not fiery, then.'' Had she not 
been cov when she led the cotillion, with her laughing brown eves, curlv black 
hair, and wistful mouth.'' Kverv one loved her, and old Jeirv Kennedy hoped 
that Jerry loved her now and would always love her. 

Jerry, as he dressed for the ball in his room at the hotel, was thinking of 
Tommy and Hilda. "Could Hilda compare with Tommy, or Tommy with 
Hilda P Could Tonniiy be as haughty as Hilda had beeii.^ Was Hilda as beau- 
tiful as Tomniv.'' Hilda with her ])ale gold, wavv hair and green eyes. Oh, 
well, the (|uestion of the moment was —he was going to a ball and did not have a 
flower for his button-hole, and it was a cirstom of the Keimedvs iievi'i' to go 
to a ball without a flower. 

As Jerry walked out of the hotel, he saw a flower girl on the next corner. 
He hurried over, and not looking up said, "May I have a s])ray of that lily-of- 
the-vallcy, please.''" 

"Yes, sir, ten cents, sir," said the girl. 

Jerrv looked u)) and saw a girl who looked ixactiv like Hilda I)u[)ont. 
Where Hilda's eves flashed luuightilv, hers flashed covlv, and where Hilda's 
mouth turned down haughtilv. hers turni'<l up covl\'. It was no wonder th;it 
Jei'rv Kennedy gas])ed. 

"What is vour name, ])rettv maid?" asked Jerrv. 

"Tilda," siie replied; "only Tilda, the flower girl." 



Jerry looked at his watch, and as it was fifteen minutes to nine he hurried 
off. It was not a custom of the Kennedys to be late. On his way to the corner 
where lie was to meet Hilda he was thinking about the queer resemblance. He 
wondered, "Was this a coincidence? Was it one girl or two? How could they 
look so much alike yet so different?" When lie arrived Hilda was not there, 
but after he iiad waited about fifteen minutes, she ste})|)ed out of her taxi, beau- 
tiful in a green spangled dress. In her iiand she was carrying a spray of lily- 
of-the-vallcy. When tiiey were seated in the taxi Jerry asked her, "Where 
did you get the flower?" 

"I found it in the taxi coming u])," she said. 

Jerry smiled to himself and said nothing more about the flower. At twelve 
o'clock he took Hilda to her beautiful home, "Dupont Castle." Then went 
back to the corner where he had seen the flower girl, but she was not there. 

About half an hour later Jerry found he had wandered a good distance off 
in searcli of tiie flower girl. He was about to turn back when he was attracted 
by a woman's voice singing. He followed the voice as best he could and came 
to a stairway leading down. He was curious (all the Kennedys were curious) 
so he descended the stairway. At the bottom he found he was in a saloon. He 
walked over to a table and sat down. Then he looked up at the girl singing. 
He was startled. For she had green eyes and pale gold, wavy hair. Now she 
started dancing. She seemed to be dancing to something in her hand. At the 
end of the dance she kissed it and threw it into the air. It was a flower. Jerry, 
seeing every one else trying to catch the flower, stretched forth his hand also, 
and he caught the flower — all tlic Kennedys were lucky. The girl came over 
and sat at the table with Jerry because he had caugiit tiie flower. Jerry looked 
at tlie flower, tiien the girl. He saw the flower was a sjn'ay of lily-of-the-valley. 
This girl looked exactly like Hilda and Tilda, only where Hilda was haughty, 
siie was flery ; and where Tilda was coy, she was flery. 

"May I ask you your name?" said Jerry. 

^ ^ ^ i^ ^- 

Jerry Kennedy iuid been in Paris seven months and the Kennedys stayed 
only six. He was jjuzzled. He did not know whether lie was in love or not. 
If he was in love, he did not know wiiether lie was in love with one girl or four 
girls. He spent tlie mornings witii Tilda, the flower girl, on the street corners; 
the afternoons with Hilda at teas or nmseums ; and the nigiits with Gilda talk- 
ing over a round wooden table in the saloon. He was tiiinking of all these 
things in his room at the hotel when he received a telegram. It said that 
Tonmiy was seriously hurt. A horse had thrown her. 

Jerry dashed out of tiie hotel. . The thought of Tommy in a mangled heap 
with a horse stamping over iier blinded iiini. Jerry thought, "Now I must go 
home. liut flrst I must tell Hilda, Tilda, and Gilda goodbye." 

Now today was Sunday and never had Jerry Kennedy been able to find any 
of the three girls on Sunday. They would apjjear again on the next day, but 
would offer no excuses. He went to the corner for Tilda, but no Tilda. He 
went to tiie saloon for Gihla, hut no Gilda. Tiien lie went to "Du]iont Castle" 
for Hilda. 



The front gate of the castle was locked ;is usual on Sunday. So for the 
first time Jerry stole around to the hack way. He found that gate o|)en, and 
crept softly in. He followed a narrow winding path luitil he canie to an open 
garden. Growing all around him were lilies-of-the-valley. In front of him 
was a high hedge. He heard voices heliind the hedge. The Kennedys never 
hesitated long, so Jerry walked through the opening in the hedge. He saw 
an elderly lady seated in a garden chaii-. In fi'ont of her on a stone bench 
were three girls all dressed in green. Each had green eyes and ])ale gold, 
wavy hair. Each one had in her hand a spray of lily-of-the-vallL\v. One was 
haughty, one coy, and one fiery. All three rose at the same time and cried, 
"Jerry!" Each seemed astonished that the other knew him. All the girls 
looked so surprised that Jerry turned to Madame l)ui)ont and said, "I met 
Hilda, (iilda, and Tilda three months ago today. I have been going with them 
<dl since, and I love them all." 

Madame Du])ont said, "I understand. Perhaps I had best ex})lain. Three 
months ago my three daughters, who are triplets, decided to go their separate 
ways. They would all three fall in love with the same man and he with them, 
so to avoid this they took separate paths. However, it seems their paths must 
have crossed. They all came home every night and spent Sunday with nie, 
and they told me they were in love with a gentleman from Kentucky, not dream- 
ing he was the same man. So now will you please maki' your decision? Which 
of my daughters do you love.''" 

.lerrv looked at each one. Could the haughty one he fierv, or the coy one 
haughty.'' Surely not — he knew them too well. lUniembering the custom of 
the family, he said: "Madame I)u])ont, it has long been a custom of our family 
that the girl we many must have four characteristics. She must be haughty, 
fiery, coy, and beautiful. Each one of your daughters has one of these char- 
acteristics but none has all. I am going to marry a girl in Kentucky who has 
all these characteristics, and more too. In a way, I love all your daughters, 
but I do not wish to marry any one of them, (loodhyc, Madame Du])ont. 

(joodbye, my three little green teni])tations." 

«. * * -* * 

liack in Kentucky, old Gerald Kennedy was dressing in his best clothes. 
Eor at four o'clock he was going to be in a wedding. Tonuny and Jerry were 
to be married. The old man was highly j)leased with himself and the wedding, 
for had he not arranged everything''' He had sent Jerry a telegram saying 
1'onnny was hurt. He wanted to know why Jerry was over staying in Paris 
and if he really loved Tonmiy. Tonnny was not hurt, hut only unha])])y. 
There had been ])ro()f enough that they loved each other by the way they em- 
bi'aced when they met. 

As the clock struck four, an old organ started softly playing the wedding 
inarch. Tonnny, radi;int in a white gown, walked dou n the aisle to meet Jerry 
at the altar. In her ai'nis she cai-ried a bou(|Uet of valley-lilies. When Jerry 
saw them, he smiled. Then the aged priest made them man and wife in the 
little brown churcli which tli(\' had attended since childhood. 

— Lii.i.iAX Ki'.i.T.'i, '215. 



Rhyme Raving 



+ •{• 



I. 



Soimhow iiiv mind don't seem to work 

So very good tonight. 
I've tried to write a verse or two. 

But they don't sound just riglit. 

II. 

I can't just seem to get tlie words 
Quite nice hke they should be. 

I write a Hne, then stop to think — 

Wliat rhymes .'' Good gracious me I 

III. 

I 'bout decided what I'll do, 

And what will rhyme with this.'' 

I'll just get out and demonstrate 
Because the word is kiss. 

— Dorothy I'uxd, '2-i. 







Quoth the Senior, "Nevermore" 

+ + 

(Apologies to Edytir Allen I'oc ) 
Once uj)()ii an e\'eninf)' druarv, wliile I p()ii(k'rc<l, tired and wearv. 
O'er a dull and curious book of nivstitving French. 
While I nodded, gently napping, suddenly there came a tapping 
As of someone gently ra])])ing, rap])ing at my chamber door. 
Then I openetl wide the shutter, when with many a Hirt and flutter 
In there stejiped the stately ghosts of many things of yore. 
And forward each guest lonely — stepped he forward and spoke only 
And each his question did outpour. 

Shall you sit here sighing by a red-Hamed fire dying, 
"Parlez-yousing" and declining? 

Quoth the Senior, "Nevermore." 
Then another spoke his word, and another woice was heard. 
Will you tete-a-tete with Otsar.? 
Haye you dates with kings of yore.'' 

Will you wake in morning early, when the dew is high and pearly.'' 
Study shorthand, trig, and math, striye to escape the teachers" wrath.'' 

Said the Senior, "Nevermore." 

And all the still was broken, as the word of each was spoken 
By this host of ghosts of meni'ries, by the ghosts all at the door. 
Shall you learn of bugs aiul mannnals, of insect lore ami ants travels 

After nineteen-twenty-four.'' 
Oh, the answer was a shudder, and a low determined mutter. 

Quoth the Senior, "Nevermore." 

Shall you wake with nightmare ringing. 
Dinosaurs arms around you clinging. 
Ghostly fossils at the door.'' 

But the silence was unbroken, till soft a whispered word was spoken, 
Oh! Quoth the Senior, "Xevermorc." 

— RosELLE Rosenthal, '"J-i. 



I Forgot 



There are excuses good and bad 

Whic'li Tubman girls may give; 

There's one which if we did without, 
I doubt if we could live. 

Indeed, it's liardly an excuse. 

Yet often out we trot it, ' 
And if we're asked about a thing 

We answer, "I forgot it." 

"Ah, I forgot to bring my book 

To French class — and, oh, say ! 
I (juite forgot mv locker key 

And this is our gym day!" 

And "I forgot this," "I forgot that." 
When we leave this world of sin 

Ah, I wonder if St. Peter 

Will forget to let us in.'' 

— Velma Bell, '25. 

Latin 

My Latin, 'tis of thee, 
Sure road to misery, 

Of thee I sing. 
I always call vou "bunk," 
"Foolishness," ""stuff," and "junk," 
I know I'm bound to flunk — 

You horrid thing! 

English does very well. 

And, though it's hard to s])cll, 

French ain't so bad. 
Of all the plagues Latin's king. 
My little brains take wing, 
I can't remember anything 

We've ever had. 

— Velma Bell, '25. 




SiFnCDUJ 

T, 




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Ine. be.rh^Avvci>.l u/a.vc 



]nt Temv k> e^- A rn*n V<vl tot. 



(lie iJuicVv cui. 

boa "J . 




Ike l-ii-^^ skih.ol 
(Lookb like A 
CLok-i Xu be 



C ou\ w,U It. 

WrMcK vvohT Come uuf" 
'n ■ ft tlri ^ i^l^ 







wa-+tr eo PCtc , or SOL " 




-Tk 



covers &eri oob I -i 



Ilk. JkUtc k.k 

tot vv.ll i. f.v ^ 1 



K 4_.Tkt»uwe . 



Rt.^... HU- 



Caught in the Act 



© 



I "r, Mr. Garrett, I am a .sub—" 

"Well, that doesn't g\\Q you permission to run down the hall as 
if vou were ^oing to a fire — and you nearly knocked me down," 
replied j\lr. Garrett. 

"But, Mr. Garrett, I am a sub—" 

"Being a 'Sub' is no excuse for such behavior. 'Subs' are sup])osed to be 
just as polite as Seniors." 

"But, but, but—" 

"That's enough. And what is worse, you are eating a sandwich. Just be- 
cause you have bobbed hair and are a 'Sub,' I su})|)ose you tiiink you can do as 
vou please. Well, if I give you a few demerits and suspend you for a week, you 
will think better of it." 

"But, Mr. Garrett, I am the sub — " 

"Yes, of course, you are a sub, but that won't keep me from giving you the 
demerits. Come, I say, give me your name." 

"J\lr. Garrett, I am the sub—" 

"How many times are you going to tell me you are a 'Sub.' Give me youi' 
name." 

"Mr. Garrett, I am the sub — " 

"What ! More of it ! Your name, young lady !" 

"Mary Brown." 

"What section .>" 

"I haven't any section, iMr. Garrett." 

"Haven't any section.''" 

"\o. I am the substitute for :\Iiss Coniev." 



-Marion Axdkews, '24. 



Mary 



I. 

Marv was a funny girl. 

So round, but yet ))ctite; 
Mary had just one thing wrong — 

Her huge and massive feet. 

II. 

Mary stunil)led wlien she walked, 
And trip])cd u]) when she ran; 

Mary slipped on everytliing. 

And on tlie ground did land. 

III. 

Many times she came to seliool. 
In tears would take her seat, 

Sliouting, 'Allah be un])raised 
For Hivinff me sueli feet." 



-DouoTHY Pfnd, '24. 




Good Resolutions for A Tubman Girl 

1. I will wear a cheerful face. 

2. I will he on time every morning. 

3. I will stay at sciiool eacii day until the fijonf; rings. 

4. I will believe the teachers of the .school are really interested in my welfare 
and want nie to be contented and hajipy in my work. 

5. I will take care of my health. 

6. I will save a little of my money each day, no matter how small the amount. 

7. I will be enthusiastic about the school's present success and future pro- 
gress. 

8. I will be co-operative, helpful and willing. 

9. I will keep my desk and room neat and tidy. 

10. I will be a Tubman booster to my friends and acquaintances, thus helj)ing 
to advertise the School. 

11. I will be economical in the use of the SchooPs property. 

12. I will shun carelessness. 

— LiLLEY White, '2.5. 




WiifiynnM 



f fOU.Ef\ 



^flV^^l-T^ 



-) 



y 



H s t: N s 



Just Wishing 



oil, I kni;w t!;:it I'll he wishing-, 
SoiiR' h'W years i'loiii today. 

That T were hack at Tiibniaii 

With hours of \vork ami ])la_v. 

Wishing- I'or dv: r old 'rulmian 

And those ha])])y days of yore; 

The days of carefree youth and joys, 
To take luc back once more. 

IjOnging to see the faces 

Of the friends who were so dear, 
Of the faculty and others 

Slowly changing year l)y year. 

Oil, rooms so thronged with nienrries 

Of hap|)iness and tears. 
Of joy aiul laughter mingling 

I'ntouched liy life's dnd) fears. 

Wishing for th.e whisjier of \()ices, 
.\iid the fun of secret notes. 

For the castles we liuilt and all oui- trijis 
Sailing in our dreamboats. 

^Vishing for the carefree heart of youth 

As life flows smootiily on. 
For joyous pranks and hajijiy fun 

Of dear days that are gone. 

And in the soft dusk dreaming, 

AVIien the years haye sped their way, 
Fll want th.e okieii tliingi again, 

Fll wish for tlieni some day. 

U Envoi 

Fll wish f(!r dear old Tubinan, 

And those lia|)))y days of yore. 

The days of carefree youth and joys. 
Oh ! take me h.-ick once more. 



TloSKI.I.E RoSKXTH.M,. '24. 



Horse Sense 



+ + 



Folks write about the blushing rose 
Or knights of long ago ; 

Some even write about the sun 
On beds of fleecy snow. 

II. 

Now all those rhymes are very nice 
To fill up lots of space, 

But do not teach a moral to 
Our pleasure loving race. 

III. 

The moral of these rhymes, my friend, 

SfTe h'yes i^l/>smT3^iMahS,or^M,r^ Is look before you leap, 

Then you won't read such rhymes as these, 
Which put you all to sleep. 

D. A. Puxn, '24. 





Af/ss ^ i>erna-thi/ 3t tAe //ors^ SAoh^. 



Jokes 



+ + 



Miss Ivey: You are making too much 
noise. I want every girl in the class to sep- 
arate. 



Ethel: Huhy and I had quite an argu- 
ment hist night ahiiut whether Jack or Bill 
was the hest looker. 

Susie: And did you decide? 

Ethel: Oh, yes, we decided there was no 
comparison between them. 



Johnny (after a tennis set): "Whew! 
That was some game. Willie and me are 
sure a close match. Willie's a peachy player, 
though. 

T. H. s, 

Miss Comey: Give me a sentence using 
the word "alumnus." 

Junior: The alumnus pans were full of 
milk. 

T. H. S. 

Bite off more than you can chew — 

Then chew it. 
Lay nut more work than you can do — 

Then do it. 
Hitch your wagon to a star, 
Keep your seat, and there you are. 

Success. 

— F. Fri.LKR, '2.5. 

T. H. S. 

Fatima Van Mosely 
Augustus de Garrett 
Was long, lean and lanky. 
Her head like a (larrot, 

Maypop Safronie 
de Camphor McFurly 
Was handsome ;ind slcndrr 
A peach of a girlie. 

JSiit 

Fate was with Fatti 
And luck was her streak. 
She married a prosjierous 
Kindhearted sheik. 

H7h7p 

Maypop's sad life 
Would put one in tears — 
She married a convict 
Who served ninetv vears. 

— D.A. PuNn, '2+. 



Beneath the moon he told his love, 
The color left her cheeks ; 

But on the slioulder of his coat 
It showed uj) jilain for weeks. 



Chemistry Teacher: "Name three articles 
containing starch." 

Senior: "Two cuft's and a collar." 



Suli-Fresh: "Can you tell me where I can 
find the nuisic room?" 

Senior: "Sure; just ask tlic first person 
you meet." 

T. H. s. 

"If some one bought the Tubman girls for 
what thfi/ know and sold them for what 
thi'i/ think they know, how nmch would he 
gain?" 

T. H. S. 

■lack: "How on earth would you con- 
struct a regular pentagon?" 

Mack: "Inscribe it in a circle." 

Jack: "But suppose Miss (Jreen would 
tell us not to put it in a circle?" 

Mack: "Well, I'd just erase the circle!" 



This is what a bright Junior B thinks cur- 
rent poetry sounds like: 

"When I wuz ist a little bit 
O 'weenty-teenty kid, 
I made up a fairv tale, 
.\ll mvsclf, I did!" 



Chris: "Jack, I am stuck on your skirt." 
Mack: "Gee, is that what makes it look 
.'() funny?" 

T. U. S. 

Mary: "Miss Halbert, what key is 
Chopin's Walt/, in A written in?" 



Considering how many umbrellas are bor- 
rowed, we wonder who docs the buying. 



Don't stare up the steps, stej) up the 
stairs. 



Courtesy is till" one iiiediiiiii of f\cli;iiip' 
that is !il\vays accepted at par." 



Miss Frank: "Why do we put a hyphen 
in liird-cafre?" 

Knlijrhtened Soph: "For the hird to sit on." 



Mr. (larrett (in office): "Wlio sent yon 
lie re? ' 

Girl: "Miss Hains and Miss Ureen." 
Mr. Garrett: "Misbehaving, I sup|)Ose?" 
Girl: "Yes, both of them." 



Mi.ss Chiles (to Sul) sitting: idly in class 
durinjr an Knglisli test): ".M;iry, why are 
you not writing?" 

Mary: "I ain't got no ])en." 

Miss Chiles: "Where's your grannnar?" 

Marv: "She's dead." 



Do ships have eyes when they go out to sea? 

Are there sjirings in the ocean's hed? 
r oe.s the river ever lose its head? 

Is a baker broke when he is making dougli? 
If you ate a square meal would the corners 
hurt? 




TheCau 



iTme W 



iLP 



Eunice C. had been ab- 
sent for the past few 
days and Miss Hollings- 
worth was explaining a 
bookkeeping transaction. 

Miss Hollingsworth — 
"Now, Eunice, if you 
have any cents (sense?) 
))ut it on the check." 
T. H. s. 

Artemus — Dat am what 
.\h calls Mountains ub 
Hot Air. 

Rastu.s— What you-all 
mean by .Mountains uli 
Hot ;\ir, nigger? 

Artenuis — Clas Ranges, 
boy, (jas Ranges ! — Tiger. 

T. H. s. 

Miss Comey (in test) 

(!ive the plural of "for- 
get-me-not," using it in a 
sentence. 

Brilliant Junior — She 
forgefs-me-not since the 
last time she saw me. 

T. H. s. 

Miss Haddock, while 

salting a Red Snapper 
for ci>oking, was asked 
the following question, bv 
a Sub.: 

"Miss Haddock, will 
the salt make the fish 
taste like a salt water 
fi.sh?" 

She replied: "Not nec- 
essarily so." 

T. H. s. 

(Question: W h y h a s 
l'',li/,al)eth an a n n u a 1 
mouth? 

Answer: Because it 
goes from "year to year." 



Just because a girl is rusty is not a reasiiu 
she has an iron constitution. 



A summer resort is wliere you exchange 
good dollars for poor (juarters. 



"And to the right," said the driver of a 
siglitseeing bus, "is the home of one of our 
most prosperous citizens. He is so rich thai 
he has Cianiond tires on his automohiles." 



Mary Plumb: "I want my hair cut." 
Barber: "Any ])articnlar way?" 
Mary: "Yes, off." 



'I'ini tooii a moonlight ri<le with his 
girl. When they had ridden about nine 
nules in almost perfect silence, Tim said 
to her: 

"Tillie, will you marry me?" She re- 
plied that she would. They rode on for 
about two miles more, and Tillie said: 

"Why don't you say something?" Tim 
said: "I think I talked too damn much 
now." 

T. H. S. 

Little Hobby and Betty .fones were 
very fond of nuiscadines luit had never 
heard them called bullaces. So (me day, 
after hearing the word for the first time, 
Bobliy asked, "What is a bullace?" 

"Oh, I know," replied Betty with con- 
scious sui)eriority. "A bullace is a girl 
cow." 

T. H. S. 

This actually happened. Alaman W — , 
in announcing his candidacy for coroner, 
made this statement: "I have held this 
office for a number of yeai's and have 
never had a complaint from any one over 
whom I have held an incpiest." 



HISTORY NOTE 

The school board visited school the 
other day, and, of course, the priiici])al 
put his pupils through their ]iaccs for the 
benefit of said austere board. 

"Henry," he asked, turning to on;' Imy, 
"who signed Magna C'harta?" 

"Please, sir, "twasn't me," whiMi)icrc<l 
Henry. 

The teacher, in disgust, told the boy 
to sit down, liut old .led Smith, chairman 
of the tobacco-chewing board, was not 
satisfied. After a well-directed aim at 
the stove, he said: "Call back that there 
boy. I dcm't like his manner. I Ijelieve 
he did do it." -Faiir L llullilhi. 




Life's Little Jokes 

A iiii'l naiiR'd Bodolia Kurcku AIcFlaiiun 
Was sure that slieM jiass cvcrv single exam, 

Wliile a ])()<)i- little thing called Liiciiula Skodiink 
Was equally certain she simply must Hunk. 

The first wouldn't study- and, sad to relate, 
An absolute "E" was ji'er terrible fate, 

But Ijucinda studied till she was 'most dead. 

And came out with laurel wreaths heaped on her head. 



-Velma Belt,, '25. 




Sn.<rgjrpt Trll-TlK. 



A TrmiAN t'ooK 



Autographs 



+ + 



FACULTY 



~^^.1SL 






^^ 



7/e-&^4^ -Cj a-^^^^-'^ 



CLASS MATES 













SCHOOiTTRlENDS 





EHD 



DO YOU KNOW 
THAT- 




OURADS 



ARE AS ENTERTAINIMG AS 

A NOVEL ? 



+ — 

I 



©ubmatt l^tgli 




FOR GIRLS 




Established in 1874. First building twice enlarged, on 700 block 
of Reynolds Street, destroyed by fire March 22, 1916. 

New building on 1700 block Walton Way erected 1917. First 
used January 26, 1918. 

Building has twenty-six Class Rooms, Principal's office, five 
Science Laboratories, Music Room, Art Room, Gymnasium, 
Library, two Study Halls, Locker Rooms, Rest Rooms, Faculty 
Room, Lunch Room, Assembly with eight hundred and sixty-four 
seats. Equipped throughout with modern school furniture. Ten 
acres School site. Large grounds for all athletic sports for girls. 

Offers Courses in the Following Subjects 



LANGUAGES: 

English 
Latin 
French 
Spanish 

MATHEMATICS: 

Arithmetic 

Algebra 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry 

Trigonometry 

HISTORY: 

Civics 

Ancient 

Modem 

American 

Economics 

SCIENCE: 

General Science 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Physics 



COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS: 
Commercial Geography 
Bookkeeping 
Stenography 
Typewriting 
Penmanship 
Business Forms and Customs 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE: 

Cooking 

Sewing 

Household Management 

Applied Art 

Drawing, Design, Etc. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING: 

VOCAL MUSIC: 

(In Class) 



T. H. GARRETT. Principal 



+ — 



I 



«L„ „„ „„ 



Girls and Savings 



The Bank for Savings has something to offer 
which adds to the attractiveness of any girl. 
Love, beauty and winsomeness cannot of course 
be stated in terms of money. But the habit of 
thrift, the love of simplicity, and the absence of 
extravagance which the Savings habit gives to a 
girl do much to insure the permanence of her 
attractiveness. 

YOU'D BE SURPRISED 

Money spent is gone. Money stolen is dreadful. 
Money lost is too bad. Money in your pocket is 
skittish. Money in the Bank — you'd be surprised. 
Try it. Open a Savings Account. 




GEORGIA RAILROAD 

BANK 



-♦ 



"" "" "'1— "•{• 



The 

National Exchange 

Bank 

"AUGUSTA'S ONLY NATIONAL BANK" 

A NATIONAL BANK 

With 

A SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 

In Which 

EVERY TUBMAN GIRL IS CORDIALLY INVITED 

TO HAVE A SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

START WHILE YOUNG 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



BFin — Better bail out the boat; she's half full. 
Bam — 'S alright; it'll run right over, scon's she's full. 

• — Medley. 



■ + 



STELLING SHOE CO. 

810 BROAD STREET 

Retailers of 
FASHIONABLE FOOTWEAR 

"YOUR INSPECTION INVITED" 



J. — 



SPECIAL DESIGNS 

AND MOLDS FOR ALL 

OCCASIONS 




Georgia-Carolina Dairy Products 

Company 
I 

i PHONES 2761-2762 925-927 WALKER ST. 



I 



Bystander (to souse who is getting on horse backwards) — Hey. youl You're getting 
on backwards. Turn around toward the horse's head. 

Souse — Aw. go to "ell; you'sh don't know wish way I'm goin.' — Moonshine. 



BREAD IS THE BEST FOOD 




Pure ^^^^^^^^^^^BSBltra Wholesome 



CixaSSetiS 

THAT GOOD BREAD 

DEMAND IT! 



IS THE BEST BREAD 



1 

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SUPERIOR ICE CREAM 

And 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 



AUGUSTA CREAMERY 



628-630 ELLIS ST. PHONES 1958-1959 



^ . . . . ..... . . .._.._.. 1 



"Hello, the Club! Is my husband there? Not there, you say? But wait — I haven't 
even told you my name." 

"Say, lady! There ain't nobody's husband here never!" was the darkey's reply. — 
Black and Blue Jay. 



Vou 'II Like Our Work 



We have enjoyed a period of successful operating 
for over twenty-five years. We are offering you 
QUALITY WORK and PROMPT SERVICE. 
Those dainty shirt waists and flimsy neghgee will 
be properly handled and carefully laundered. In 
fact if it's anything to be laundered remember — 



HULSE LAUNDRY 

"JUST A GOOD ONE" 

A. H. HARDY, Prop. 
513 - PHONES - 6871 



+ — 







1 1 JL 



:3 

THAT SATISFY 

At Prices That Please 

We Are Prepared — 

For the "Sweet Girl Graduate" who wants the correct styles for 

Spring and Summer. 

You must see our wonderful variety of styles to appreciate our 

efforts to please you. 

Special Discount fiven on Footwear for Commencement. 

SwmrCufflmShocCa 



E?"^3sn«» ALWK1S BUSY 






T. R. HENDERSON & CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS 
436 EIGHTH STREET PHONE 2333 




Every vc\ed\ ^Everyday 

We appreciate the Tubman girls using SUNSHINE Biscuits 

exclusively 

Gardner's Famous Cakes, SUNSHINE Biscuits, 

FOX RIVER BUTTER 



Enterprise Manufacturing Co, 

Manufacturers of 

FINE COTTON GOODS 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



Spindles— 35,250 



Looms— 980 



+, — . 



. 4. 



SO WERE THE BRAINS 

He — The engine seems to be missing, sweetheart. 
She — That's all right, dear, it doesn't show. 

— Punch Bowl. 







TWIN FAaS FLOUR MILLS 

TWIN FtllS. IDAHO 

Idahume Flour 

BLEACHED 

i IDAfiOME FLOQB 



"BREAD IS THE STAFF OF LIFE" 
For a Dependable Staff Use 

IDAHOME FLOUR— Plain 
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MAKES PERFECT BISCUIT, ROLLS, 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



CARR-LEE GROCERY CO. 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 






DELICIOUS SOUTHERN BISCUITS 

MADE FROM 

EARLY BREAKFAST 
SELF-RISING FLOUR 

CLARK MILLING CO. 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



A young man with a pretty but flirtatious fiance wrote to a rival: "I hear that you 
have been kissing my girl: Come to my office at eleven on Saturday; I want to have 
this out." 

His reply was: "I have received your circular letter, and will be at the meeting." — 
Punch Bowl. 



*!=-' 



Augusta-Aiken Railway & 
Electric Corporation 

POWER LIGHT HEAT 

STREET CAR SERVICE 

Good Wishes for the Tubman Girls 
Expressed in Efficient Service 



Build with Brick or Tile 



Whether it be solid brick. Ideal brick wall, all tile, 
or tile faced with brick, you will have the most 
durable, safest, most economical, and most com- 
fortable house that can be built. 

Will be glad to tell you why. 



Georgia-Carolina Brick 
Company 

HOWARD H. STAFFORD, President AUGUSTA, GA. 



4. 



.._.. — ^ 



Prof. — "My boy, do you ever fail to eniljrace an opportunity." 
Boy — "It depends, sir, on the form of the opportunity." — Masquerader. 



DEPENDABLE LIFE INSURANCE 



LORICK & VAIDEN 



$5,000 FOR $46.45 AGE 35 
(Limit $100,000) 



+ +- 



DRINK 

ORANGE CRUSH 

NuGRAPE 
BUFFALO ROCK 



Orange Crush Bot. Co. 



ALL PICTURES IN 
THIS ANNUAL 



MADE BY 



TOMMINS 

852 BROAD STREET 
AUGUSTA. GA. 






There was a thin maiden called Lena 
Who bought a new vacuum cleana. 

But she got in the way 

Of its suction one day 
And since then nobody has seena. 

^Wasp. 



4. 



PALMERSPIVEY 

CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 

BUILDERS OF THE TUBMAN, HOUGHTON AND 
MONTE SANO SCHOOLS 



AUGUSTA, GA. 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



CONGRATULATING 

ANOTHER CLASS OF TUBMAN GRADUATES 

—The Class of 1924! 

Remember, girls, you are among our most valued customers. We 
want to be of real service to you, now, and on thru the FUTURE — 
that wonderful time that is just opening up for you. It is our ambi- 
tion to supply you with the things you want, at prices that represent 
fullest value to you. That is our justification for being in this busi- 
ness of selling. 

If we can help NOW with the graduation 
wardrobe and accessories — LATER with 
college equipment. Please let us do so. 



tMMte^ 




so ROUGH AND STRONG 

Little Girl — Mother, where do they keep the cross-eyed bear 
in Sunday School? 

Mother — What cross-eyed bear, dear? 

Little Girl — Oh, the "Holy Cross I'd Bear" they sing about 
all the time. — Yale Record. 

^„ ,„ „ ,^ ,^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 



., — +■ 



Compliments 



MODJESKA IMPERIAL 
RIALTO 

THE A TRES 



McGOWAN SHOE COMPANY 

984 BROAD ST. PHONE 1407 i 

i 

Everything in Footwear and Always Lower in Price J 

i 



GYM SHOES OUR SPECIALTY 



! 



HATS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 

MEN'S, WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S— EVERY 
SHAPE AND STYLE MADE 

S HERON'S 



S78-80 BROAD STREET 



I 
+ ■■ 



+ 



STULB'S RESTAURANT 

OPPOSITE MONUMENT 

735 BROAD STREET 
j W. J. Heffernan Proprietors Carl P. Byne 

i 

4. ._. — „_.._.._.,_„ .. .._.._,._.._.._.,_., + 

+ . + 



! 

L I SCHAUL & CO. ^ 

DL\MONUS AND jKWELKV 
840 RROAD STREET PHONE 543 



+ 



..._4 



Compliments of 



Augusta Lumber Co. 



1 

+ ■_-•,»— HI yy,— •.. y. yy y. uy yy uy yy yy yy i.y yy yy yy uy y. yy yy yy .y yy^yy ■■ By^UU I1*t» 
M— UH— NX My.— ■■ ; im KM UN ■■ MU »» y- y- uy uii yy yy kn ■■ yy yy yy uy ■i.^yy yy yy-^uu ii»J« 



Compliments of 



®I|f Aug«0ta QIi)rnmrlp 



THE SOUTH'S OLDEST NEWSPAPER 



•*• 



Compliments of 



Alexander S^ Garrett 



+ — 



PIGGLY WIGGLY 

FOR PICNIC SUGGESTIONS VISIT OUR STORES 

At 

730 BROAD STREET 504 BROAD STREET 

1132 BROAD STREET CRAWFORD and FENWICK STS. 



i 



•». 



The Augusta Herald 



Compliments of \ 

i 

i 

THE HOME NEWSPAPER 1 

! 
The ONLY Paper in Many Homes— The One Paper ! 

in MOST Homes ! 



MURPHEY & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1844 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



AUGUSTA'S OLDEST BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENT 



I 



SPORTING GOODS 

JANTZEN SWIMMING SUITS 

TENNIS SUPPLIES 

Bowen Bros. Hardware Co. 

829 BROAD STREET 



THE 
INTERNATIONAL VEGETABLE OIL 

COMPANY 

"COW FEEDS" 



•-M~— ><•{• 



VMt UNIV£|l»Ab CAo 



SALES SERVICE PARTS 

HOWARD HOLDEN 
MOTOR CO. 

i 521-523 BROAD STREET PHONE 357 



+ .._.._. 


ESTABLISHED 1868 


The Perkins 


Manufacturing Company 


YELLOW PINE LUMBER 


MILL WORK 


DOORS, SASH AND BLINDS 


620 13th St. 


AUGUSTA, GA. Phone 3 

. r 



I 



The Realty Savings & Trust Co. 

827 BROAD STREET 

Solicits and appreciates the Savings Accounts of young ladies 

We \ 51/^% on time certificates 
Pay ^ 5% on savings accounts 

(All deposits secured by First Mortgage on Improved Augusta 
Real Estate.) 

J. LEE ETHEREDGE, President J. FRANK CARSWELL. Vice-President 

LEROY W. LYETH, Secretary-Treasurer 



+■■ 



4- 



Compliments of 

ATLANTIC ICE & COAL 
CORPORATION j 

! 
♦ 1 



STRENGTH-SAFETY-SERVICE 



UNION SAVINGS BANK 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
INTEREST PAID QUARTERLY 



, — 4, 



"How do you know he's in love?" 

"What else would make a man absent-minded enough to put 
his dirty shirt to bed and then jump down the clothes chute?" — 
Sun Dodger. 



LIKE SUNSHINE IN WINTER 



A reminder of summer, a 

promise of spring, but a 

present delight above 

everything 

DRINK BOTTLED 




Delicious and Refreshing 



The Citizens and Southern 

BANK 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

4% Paid on Savings Quarterly. Start Life Right by Opening a 

Savings Account 

TOTAL ASSETS OVER $70,000,000.00 

NO ACCOUNT TOO LARGE— NONE TOO SMALL 

ACTS AS EXECUTORS, GUARDIANS, TRUSTEES 



Genius pops up where least expected. Frinstance, the butcher who, having read about 
the "milk from contented cows," advertised; "Sausage from pigs that die happy." 



-.. »— n , , 



"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" 

STULB'S NURSERY 

"AUGUSTA'S LEADING FLORIST" 



■ — + 
— H- 



DESIGNERS and MANUFACTURERS of 

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE JEWELRY 

HERFF-JONES CO. 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



♦——■——— —————— ——"——+ + 

i 



MORRISON 

SATISFACTORY 
CONTRACTOR 



112 EIGHTH STREET 

PHONE 288 



Personal Beauty 

Is a Better Introduction Than Any 
Letter. — DioKiiu's. 



ELIZABETH ARDEN 

Preparations Combine All That 

Could Be Desired to Make 

Your Dressing Table 

Complete 

You Will Find Also at Our Store 

A Complete Line of Unicum 

Hair Nets 

GARDELLE'S 

726 BROAD STREET 



+ 



* +■ 



AN OLD TIN TYPE 
Squire — Did you send for me, my lord? 

Launcelot — Yes, make haste. Bring me the can opener; 
I've got a flea in my knight cloths. 



LOMBARD 

IRON WORKS 

& SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

AUGUSTA, GA. 

MACHINERY, SUPPLIES 

REPAIRS, CASTING 

ROOFING, PUMPS 

EVERYTHING FOR THE 
MILL 



+■■ 
1 

I 



+ + 



Augusta Stock 
Yard Company 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
Leaders in 

HORSES AND MULES 

CAN SUPPLY YOUR WANTS 
AND SAVE YOU MONEY 



.+ 4.-.. 



■ — + 



GIRLS' SHOP 

We specialize in Hosiery, 
Athletic Sweaters, Coats, Reg- 
ulation Middies and Dresses 
for Girls. 

Agents for Spalding's 
Athletic Goods 

Madge Evans Hats 
for Girls 



Buy 

The Tubman 

Girls 

GRADUATION 
GIFTS 

AT 



Schweigert's 

The Leading Jeweler 



Wife — "Oh. George, do order a rat trap to be sent home today. 
George — "But you bought one last week." 
Wife — "Yes, dear, but there's a rat in that one." 



Murphy 

Stationery 

Company 

High Grade Correspondence ! 
Papers and Cards ' 



, — 4. 



ENGRAVING 

GRADUATION AND GIFT 

BOOKS 

Waterman Fountain Pens 

KODAKS and FILMS 



■ — ■ ^• 



Goetchius ' 

Broad and Seventh Sts. 

DRUGS 

SODA WATER 
KODAKS 
CANDY 

Goetchius ' 



George C. Blanchard Francis A. Calhoun 

Blanchard & 
Calhoun 

REAL ESTATE 

Insurance 
Investment Securities 

Homes for Sale Convenient to 
TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

MARION BUILDING 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



I 

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I 



.. 4 4. 



QUALITY GARDEN 
HOSE 


HUTT 


'S 


PLUMBING 
SUPPLIES 




4. . . . — . — 





"Father," asked the young son, who was trying to make out an 
English lesson, "what is an idiom?" 

"An idiom, my boy, is a woman idiot." — Witt. 










LADIES' OUTFITTERS 

Our Authentic Styles and Mod- 
erate Prices Have Earned 
for this Store the Repu- 
tation of 

"THE STORE OF BETTER 
VALUES" 






Girls! 
Remember. 



You want to be 
UP-TO-DATE of course, 
and let us install for you 
a modern All-Gas kitchen 
when you start 
to HOUSEKEEPING. 



The Gc\s Light Co. 

OF AUGUSTA 



I,.- + ,>„- 



-.._• ' 



+-.. 



.._.. — + 



Compliments 
of 

SMITH BROS. CO. 



PICTURES AND FRAMING 
PICTURE FRAMING 

THE BEST 
AT LOWEST PRICES 

HARPER BROS. ART 
STORE 



426 EIGHTH ST. 



PHONE 730 



Compliments 
of 

G. LLOYD PREACHER 
& COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 
ATLANTA, GA. RALEIGH, N. C. 

+ , 



^ -«n r» -IN I.B ■ "" »" 'I" "" "*p »jf»-"" t 



WOODLAWN PALACE 
MARKET 

J. p. McMichael, Prop. 

FRESH MEATS, POULTRY, 
EGGS, OYSTERS, ETC. 



619 Fifteenth St. 



Phones 8-1989 



Judge — Twenty days for vagrancy. Lock him up, Dan. 

Prisoner — But, your Honor, I am not as corrupt as Swift, as dissipated as 
Poe, as depraved as Byron, or as pervert as — 

Judge— That will do. Get the names of those other fellows, Dan, and bring 
them in. They're a had lot. — Jack o' Lantern. 



^ 



., — 4. 



ANNUAL 

ADVERTISING 

HAS INDEFINITE VALUE 

IT LIVES AS LONG AS 

THE STUDENT 

IT LASTS AS LONG AS THE 

ANNUAL 



+— - 



•■+ *- 



Compliments of 

GEORGIA IRON 
WORKS 



4. — 



I 

i 

-+ *- 

- + + - 



For Best Building Materials 
Call on 

Youngblood Roofing and 
Mantel Company 

635 Broad St., Augusta, Ga. 



Maxwell Brothers 
FURNITURE 

937 Broad St. Phone 836 

Augusta, Georgia 



. — . ^ 

FRANK J. STORY CO. 

PAINT AND GLASS 
HEADQUARTERS 

855 BROAD ST. 



King — What, ho. call the guard. 

Prime Minister — Sire, it is raining, and the guard has lost his 
umhrella. 

King — Then, by all means, what ho, the mudguard. — Chaparral. 



4.-. 
I 



, . . — . — .. ^, ^.- 



I Southern States Phosphate 
1 & Fertilizer Co. 

AUGUSTA. GA. 

ALL GRADES OF MIXED 
FERTILIZER 

ACID, KAINIT and NITRATE 
SODA 



GENERAL TIRE AND 
SUPPLY CO. 

GOOD SERVICE 

1166 BROAD STREET 



_„„ „. „„ „„ „„ .,_4« «L.i nil iiii nil nil nil 



■n* ^.-nn 



VISIT 

THE COZY STORE 

Whire you will find new and well selected 
stocks of 

MILLINERY, 

UNUSUAL GIFTS 

NOVELTIES 

E. C. BALK & CO. 

918 BROAD ST. PHONE 382 



^ 



RHODES-HARKINS 
FURNITURE CO. 

COMPLETE 
HOUSE FURNISHERS 

1007 BROAD ST. 
AUGUSTA, GA. PHONE 672 



,{. 



J. +.. 



• naCn J. ,,„ 



AUGUSTA DRUG CO. 

Wholesale Druggists 

305 to 311 JACKSON ST. 

Augusta, Georgia 



I 



CARROLL 

COTTON 



Scott Nixon 



Walter G. Fargo 



-+ +■ 



i 

i 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

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I 
-+ 



*- 

I 
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! 
I 

i 
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1 
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H. H. BELL 

REALTORS 

Real Estate, Renting, Fire Insur- 
ance, Loans 

104 Masonic Building. Augusta, Georgia 






CONSUMERS 
GROCERY CO. 

Distributors For 

PURINA FEEDS 

PHONE 783 1101 BROAD ST. 



"Stop! I've never heard sueh profanity .since tlie day 1 
was born." 

"VVhat were you, a twin or a triplet?" — Royal Galjoon. 



•f 



CARPENTER'S 

5050 

GROCERTERIA 

STRICTLY AN AUGUSTA 
CONCERN 

710 BROAD ST. 



I 



+ 



WHITNEY-McNEILL 
ELECTRIC CO. 

BEAUTIFUL BOUDOIR LAMPS AND 
CURLING IRONS 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES, ETC. 



sn IIRD.M) ST. 



riioiic i:!li; 



-+ +- 



, , + 


BAILIE-EDELBLUT FUR- 


NITURE CO. 


THE QUALITY STORE 


708-710-712 BROADWAY 


COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHINGS 


Second Floor 


r. + 



LAND DRUG CO. 

Broad and Twelfth Sts. 

Drugs, Toilet Articles, Candy, i 
Cigars and Soda Water ! 

i 

i 



^if- + + 



I 



AWNINGS PORCH SHADES 
WALL PAPER 

T. G. BAILIE & CO. 

712 BROAD ST. 
4. 



i 



J. A. MULLARKY CO. 

830 BROAD ST. PHONE 290 

The most reliable store 
to buy your Dry Goods 
and Ready-to-Wear. 



COME IN 



THANK YOU 



ELLIS ICE & COAL CO. 

DEPENDABLE 

1400 BLOCK ELLIS STREET 
AUGUSTA GEORGIA 



+ - 

I 

i 
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Compliments 
of 

ARRINGTON BROS. 
&CO. 



"How did you get that cut on your head?" 
"Hie — niusta — hie — l)it myself." 
"Gwan. How could you bite yourself up there?" 
"Musta stood on a chair."- — Goblin. 



+-■ 



MRS. S. E. BELL 

Importer Milliner Maker 

Exclusive but Never Expensive 

The Hat for the Woman — The Hat for the 

Dress — The Hat for the Occasion 

LOBBY MASONIC BUILDING 

Left of Elevator — Jackson or Broad Street 

Entrance 



Compliments 
of 



J. P. DOUGHTY, JR. 



+ 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 
FOR ALL SPORTS 



.+ +. — 
+ + 



I 



CULLEY & HAIR 

Sporting Goods and Hardware j 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA. | 



I 

i 

i 
-+ 

•■+ 



C. T. FUND & CO. 

Grocers' Specialties 

Agents for 
GELFAND'S Combination Relish 

I and Mayonnaise 

+ 4 



+ 



PERKINS SASH & 
DOOR CO. 

HIGH GRADE MILL WORK 

LUMBER AND 

BUILDING MATERIAL 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



+•■ 



A House Can Depreciate Sadly in a 
Few Years Without Paint! 

"SAVE THE SURFACE 
AND YOU SAVE ALL." 

■YOU CAN GET IT AT McDANIEL'S" 

A. H. McDANIEL 

434 8th Street AUGUSTA. GA." 

Material From Foundation to Roof 



i 



REMINGTON PORTABLE 
TYPEWRITERS 

Have Standard Keyboards Just 
Like the Big Machines 

IDEAL FOR HOME USE AND 
TRAVELING 

L. J. HENRY 

THE TYPEWRITER MAN 

AUGUSTA, GA. j 

i„^_„„ uii^— uM u>i un uu (III ui na bh— ■• an bb— •!• 



I 

McDonald & co. 

QUALITY SERVICE 

GROCERS 

1130 BROAD ST. 



4. 



■ ■ + 



Little Mary — Mamma, I don't have to eat this egg, do I ? It doesn't smell good. 
Big Mary — Mary, how often must I tell you not to complain about your food? Eat 
that egg! 

Little Mary (after a brief pause) — Mamma, must I eat the beak, too? — Dodo. 



,_.._. ., — ,_, — ,_., 4. 

HOME SEEKERS 

If you want to be assured of finding 

the right place to suit your needs 

and your pocket-book, consult 

J. MILO HATCH 
REALTOR 



GROUND FLOOR 



LAMAR BLDG. 



. 4, 



C. E. SCHUMACHER 
FLOUR CO. 

Jobbers of 

DAINTY AND PICNIC 
FLOURS 

AUGUSTA. GA. 



I 

! 
I 



<■ 



! ! 
I I 



MARKS & EDMUNDS 

PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY 
COMPOUNDED 

Toilet Articles, Stationery, Pure Ice 

Cream and Norris Candy 

PHONES 615 and 9110 

Corner THIRTEENTH and BROAD STS. 



+- 

I 
I 



JOHN F. CARSWELL 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
ICE CREAM 

Quality — Courtesy — Service 

846 LIBERTY ST. PHONE 9171 



,._+ 



■ — + •!•— 



I 
1 

4"- 
+- 



LET US DO YOUR REPAIR 
WORK 

We Will Gladly Send For Car 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

We Have Up-to-date Repair 

Equipment 

None But Genuine Ford Parts Used 

LOMBARD MOTOR CO. 

719 Broad Street Phones 2249 and 3191 

Opposite Monument 



+ 



HARDWICK & FERRIS 

REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

And 
INSURANCE 

22 CAMPBELL BUILDING 



E. J. Hernlen 



Fred Herring 



i I 



WIRTZ & HERNLEN 
COMPANY 

Dealers in 

Hardware and Farm Machinery 
The John Deere Line 

eOl BROAD ST, PHONE 3604 



— . 4 





BRICK 


4. 




Manufactured By 






MERRY BROS. 




Will 


Make You a Real Home 1 


Have 


"Him" Come to See 


Us 


401-4 MASONIC BUILDING 





Jimniie Stevenson, the littlest member of De Molay, was standing on the street corner 
crying loudly. "Don't cry, little man," said a kind old gentleman. "You'll get your 
reward in the end." To which Jimniie snifl'ed and replied, "I — I suppose I will, — that's 
where I usually get it," 



T. D. Cary 



Warren Bothwell 



T. D. CAREY & CO. 

INVESTMENTS SECURITIES 

Liberty Bonds Bought, Sold 
Quoted 



i 
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-+ ^.. 






DRINK 

CHERO-COLA 

"There's None So Good" 



ELECTRICAL REPAIRS 

Motors, Lighting, Wiring, Radio 

Motors Bought, Sold and Rented 

Houses Wired, Radio Sets Sold and 

Installed 

Repairs to anything electrical 

EVE REPAIR CO. 

852 CHAFEE AVE. PHONE 1727 



..- + 

— + 



Compliments 
of 

AUGUSTA GROCERY 
COMPANY 



THIS ANNUAL WAS PRINTED BY 



Stigplg-StitufU OId. 



SPECIALISTS IN 



HIGH-GRADE PRINTING 




NO ORDERS TOO SMALL FOR 
OUR USUAL SERVICE 

820 REYNOLDS ST. 







4> 



IStJiigdy-®t&ujpIl (flnmpanij. 3nr.